Posts Tagged ‘education’

Bookmarks for June 21st through July 24th

Bookmarks for June 21st through July 24th

These are my links for June 21st through July 24th: TALK- Kenneth Goldsmith – Tank Magazine- “NR: Who contributes to Ubu, and how is it curated?KG: Ubu doesn’t generate any of its own content. Instead, films and sounds are taken from very exclusive file-sharing groups and released to the public. The decision as to what […]


Bookmarks for May 7th through May 18th 2011

Bookmarks for May 7th through May 18th 2011

These are my links for May 7th through May 18th: April2011M 624 – The Case For Making Online Textbooks Open Source [INFOGRAPHIC] – “As companies compete to digitize the textbook market, there is one approach that shakes the traditional publishing business model: open source textbooks, whose proponents believe online educational tomes should be free.” And […]


Bookmarks for May 6th through May 10th

Bookmarks for May 6th through May 10th

These are my links for May 6th through May 10th: The first sign that humans are on the verge of evolving into another species [Evolution] – “What Carlson’s work suggests is that species whose brains are evolving fairly rapidly – hello, Homo sapiens – are likely candidates for speciation under the right circumstances. The key […]


Bookmarks for May 1st through May 2nd

Bookmarks for May 1st through May 2nd

These are my links for May 1st through May 2nd: L.A. as foster city run by outsiders – "Something narrow and coarse in the imaginations of the McCourts and Zell and Selig and their business partners squeezed out any moral dimension to their deals or any feeling for Los Angeles. But to question how they […]


In Remembrance of the Great Recession

In Remembrance of the Great Recession

while i was sitting in traffic yesterday i started to think how about how much this financial disaster has changed the lives of my friends and family over the last two years. it’s one thing to get caught of the larger debate (and the spectacle of it all), but maybe the best way we can decide whether we are going in the right direction is a personal assessment of our own community. so on this memorial day weekend i’m taking a personal inventory of my community (colleagues, friends, family and neighbors) to remember how bad things have become during our “Great Recession

In Remembrance of the Great Recession of 2008-2010

  • of my family member who has lost his catering business
  • of my family member whose job has been moved to the east coast and but whose termination keeps getting delayed 6 months at a time
  • of my family member who lost his job in retail and now works as a temporary manual contract (scab) labor to pay the bills
  • of those of us whose property value is under water
  • of my neighbor who is over 50 and lost his private sector job a year ago and hasn’t been able to find any work
  • of my neighbor who was planning to retire and whose pension has lost so much value he has to work at least 5 more years
  • of my new neighbors who lost their house and are now renting next door
  • of the neighbors who have have lost their homes (and are sitting empty) along my daily walk through the neighborhood (1 out of every 6 the last i counted)
  • of my friend who lost his job and is now working whatever part time work he can to put food on the table
  • of many of my part time colleagues at CSUF who have lost work or have had their hours dramatically cut
  • of my secondary school colleagues who have been pink slipped and/or displaced for this fall
  • of those of us at CSUF and secondary schools who still have jobs in education but have taken a 10% pay cut and at least 3 weeks of furlough
  • of those friends of friends who have cashed in their retirement plans to make ends meet
  • of those who have moved into a smaller house and/or moving in with parents for housing
  • i also have realized that we also have to take some personal responsibility here and maybe we created much of these problems because our inability to live within our means and are now collectively paying the piper.

    from what i see many of us are helping each other out, but where has our government been? this is biggest crisis to happen in my life and it seems that we are expected to get through this storm on our own.

    where are the WPA type jobs programs? where did the stimulus money go? has the promise of an education for all disappeared for good? (at least in california)

    my fear is that a few years from now we are going to look back and realize that the middle class dream of being able to work a decent job for decent pay died in the summer of 2010 and was traded for that old libertarian mantra “it’s every man for himself”


    links for 2010-04-06

    links for 2010-04-06
    • my music for controllers gets released on the blacksquare netlabel
    • “Latinos are half of the population of L.A. but they still see us as an uncomfortable appendage, as if we were a tumor that grows on and invades half the body; it is occupying the space but it is not the body itself.”

      Kevin Roderick: Daniel Hernandez, the former Los Angeles Times and LA Weekly staff writer now working for the LAT bureau in Mexico City, is not a fan of The Entryway.

    • “schliz writes “Like in World of Warcraft, students of Indiana University’s game design classes start as Level 1 avatars with 0 XP, and progress by completing quests solo, as guilds, or in ‘pick up groups.’ Course coordinator Lee Sheldon says students are responding with ‘far greater enthusiasm,’ and many specifics of game design could also be directly applied to the workforce. These included: clearly defining goals for workers; providing incremental rewards; and balancing effort and reward.”"
    • “Governments of the Industrial World, you weary giants of flesh and steel, I come from Cyberspace, the new home of Mind. On behalf of the future, I ask you of the past to leave us alone. You are not welcome among us. You have no sovereignty where we gather.”
    • “Hindsight is always 1080p.
      One #hashtag does not a trending topic make.
      Too many hosts spoil the podcast.
      That’s a hard act to unfollow…. and more”
      (tags: funny)
    • “Decades before last month’s tragic earthquake, Haiti was in the news because of an upheaval of an entirely different kind. The republic had been occupied by American troops for 19 years. But after a series of bloody massacres and insurrections, the U.S. Marines were withdrawn in 1934. Two years later, an American named Alan Lomax landed in Haiti not with weapons but with a portable recording device. He’d been commissioned by the Library of Congress to document Haiti’s ethnomusic traditions.”
    • Exploring the work of the filmmaker who defined the term “eccentric genius.”
    • “Huarache de Cabeza

      A huarache, the definitive unit of Mexico City street food, is a flattish, concave trough of masa shaped like a size-12 sandal, pan-fried or deep-fried, then smeared with beans, sprinkled with meat and layered with lettuce, grated cheese and cream. Part of the fun is eating the thing — a huarache is too brawny to attack with a flimsy plastic fork, and you will either burn your fingers or wait for your lunch to cool into corn-flavored cement. Emily Post provides no guidelines for eating a huarache. You can have a huarache topped with almost anything, from the black corn fungus called huitlacoche to standard-issue steak, but I like it best with cabeza — rich, gelatinous meat pulled from a cow’s head and cooked down into an ultraconcentrated essence of beef. El Huarache Azteca #1, 5225 York Blvd., Highland Park.”

    • great blog by reporters telling the “story about the story”
    • the place to go for authentic fish tacos!
    • “The school board turns over most of the 30 campuses targeted for reform to instructors.
      In an unlikely victory, groups of teachers, rather than outside operators, will run the vast majority of 30 campuses under a controversial school reform effort, the Los Angeles Board of Education decided Tuesday.”
    • interesting that this comes out the week i get a mirror-less m43 camera this. i am the zeitgeist!

      “Mirrorless, interchangeable-lens cameras could change the game for the DSLR, which has been the fastest growing sector of the camera market.”

    • “when i was a kid we had to write on both sides of the paper, i guess i learned not to throw things out from there”
      “i really don’t think an image should be owned, how can you own words?”
    • ” have a particular interest in a style of tuning called just-intonation, where the notes of an instrument are tuned to pure harmonic intervals, which can be expressed mathematically as whole number fractions (2/1, 3/2, 4/3, etc…). Contemporary western musicians are almost completely ignorant of just-intonation, despite its supreme simplicity. Lou Harrison says it well: “It seems to me that children – when they come to fractions in their study of mathematics – ought to be allowed to tune these relationships; &, too, that they certainly might well learn the ratios for at least the two commonest modes of their own culture.”
      (tags: bio music)

    Bookmarks for March 2nd through March 6th [del.icio.us]

    Bookmarks for March 2nd through March 6th [del.icio.us]

    Bookmarks from March 2nd through March 6th:[del.icio.us]

  • A march on March 4th – [del.icio.us] one CSULA student’s point of view of the march 4th marches (via: LA Eastside)
  • Improving Education Through Better Teachers – [del.icio.us]
  • Why Ad Blocking is devastating to the sites you love – [del.icio.us]
  • El TakiTaco – Highland Park – [del.icio.us]
  • Like a car accident – [del.icio.us]
  • CSUN Protest – [del.icio.us]
  • Chimerica – [del.icio.us]
  • Advice: Do NOT Get A Circumcision On Craigslist – [del.icio.us]
  • Faces of Science #21 – [del.icio.us]
  • Michael Hiltzik: More on the Lap-Band guys – [del.icio.us]
  • 10 Important Questions About Renee Fleming’s New Indie Album <b>…</b> – [del.icio.us]
  • Will Monkey Wrench Collective leave Fullerton? – [del.icio.us]
  • CSUF Humanities Building Reclaimed « STRIKE/ORGANIZE/MARCH 4TH – [del.icio.us] “And this is precisely why we are reclaiming the Humanities building: because we do not trust an administration that seeks to marginalize alternative narratives to the University of Phoenix business model (p. 10); because we cannot acquiesce to a university administration that called the 2007 CSUF on-campus noose-hangings merely an “offensive act” and not a hate crime; because we refuse to allow the absence of any disruption to a university system that seeks to expel Muslim students at UC Irvine for protesting a pro-Zionist speaker while a woman who hangs a noose at UC San Diego faces mere suspension; because it is absolutely impossible to offer our complicity towards the systematic downsizing of staff and adjunct faculty; and, finally, because we offer our solidarity to the Tongva Indians who, for 18 years, have been fighting developers to preserve the Puvunga, a burial ground on the western edge of campus of CSU Long Beach.”
  • Toyota flower patch on 110 culture-jammed – [del.icio.us]
  • Oppens and Rzewski to play at 9th annual New Music Festival in Fullerton – [del.icio.us]
  • Topeka renames itself ‘Google, Kan.’ to campaign for fiber-optic network – [del.icio.us]
  • Musician and Critic? « Jim Perkins [del.icio.us] – [del.icio.us] “My last post about tagging mediocre music as tepid has courted me a little criticism from friends who claim that if you go around being negative about other music & musicians you will just end up alienating people and getting your own music slagged off, essentially you can’t be a critic and a musician…”
    Ok rant over…”
  • Adam Lisagor Responds to The iPhone App Review’s Shakedown Attempt – [del.icio.us]

  • An Education for All: My Story

    An Education for All: My Story

    22 years ago from last fall i was going into my senior year at wichita state university as a full scholarship student. this should have been a good thing, but there was a ‘small’ hitch because at that time WSU only gave three year scholarships. overall it shouldn’t have been much of a problem because i thought i had worked it out with my parents.

    you see they weren’t too excited about me going to music school (my father’s reaction was “you can major in music?”) so they refused to pay for school. of course this pretty severely limited my choices for college, but I practiced quite hard and probably surprised them when I got a full ride (room/tuiton/books) scholarship to WSU. all in all they weren’t so happy with my continued insistence to attend music school but we did come to a deal in which as long as i made my grades and they will pay for my senior year.

    of course things didn’t go quite as planned. the summer before my senior year I’m on the road all summer performing with the Madison Scouts Drum and Bugle Corps and didn’t have much contact with my parents. when i got back to school i found out not only did father run off with his bosses secretary, but he also locked my mom out of all the bank accounts. not only there was no money for school, there was no money at all.

    so to make a long story short, there was no way for me to continue school at WSU ($9,000 a year in 1989 dollars), so i pretty quickly made some connections and in fall 1989 i moved out california to start over. by 1995 i had established residency, worked as a fulltime musician at disneyland, finally finished my degree at CSUF and began teaching at Marshall High in LAUSD. since then i added a masters in composition (at CSUF) and now teach in the same system that made it possible for me to pull myself up with very little support.

    unfortunately the very educational system that has given me a 2nd chance is quickly disappearing and we are losing what has made california one of the few states that had a higher education master plan that stressed AN EDUCATION FOR ALL.

    of course this is only one story, but over the last 15 years i could always point out out that no matter how bad things got, a college education was one of the best and realistic solutions. right now is the time to start doing something about this and hopefully the marches today are only the beginning.


    Bookmarks for January 5th through January 11th [del.icio.us]

    Bookmarks for January 5th through January 11th [del.icio.us]

    Bookmarks from January 5th through January 11th:[del.icio.us]

    • Till we meet again, in some screening room in the dark. (15) – By Roger Ebert Slate Magazine -
      “To be fair, James Cameron undoubtedly knows this about genetics. We already know how the female Na’vi evolved breasts. They evolved them on Cameron’s drawing board, because you can’t have a love affair between two Na’vi who are both breastless and therefore apparently male. The bloggers from the tinfoil-hat brigade would really go bonkers then. Roger”
    • L.A. charter schools flex their educational muscles – latimes.com -
      “Bauer, the Granada Hills principal who wanted the district “leveled,” said he actually sees that happening — but from inside, and by the district’s own choice. “I think the current centralized L.A. Unified structure is being leveled by the superintendent and board,” he said. “I think the climate has changed a lot,” said Jennifer Epps, principal of , a high-performing elementary school in Historic South-Central. “I think that just overall, they’ve been realizing that what they’re doing isn’t necessarily right for every school . . . and they’re saying, ‘We don’t have the resources to change these schools fast enough. . . . We need other solutions.’ “
    • Quotes on music -
      “To those composers who use MIDI and drum machines: Keep using them! Realizing your scores via MIDI is not inherently better or worse than hearing them in your head. If you haven’t already, you will eventually figure out how to make your MIDI devices do things no one ever thought they would do! And then you might learn how to hear those kinds of things in your head, something that [the conductor] Dennis Russell Davies will never be able to do.” — Corey Dargel
    • The Founders Of Computer / Electronic Music | soundseller BLOG -
      “Six world-renowned pioneers of computer and electronic music gather at Tulane University to discuss the future of the form – both as they saw it in 1967 and as they see it today…”
    • Dave Winer: “I’m a mystic about What It All Means.” -
      “…Dave Winer’s writings make you “think.” What does this really mean? The best response comes from Winer himself in a remarkable note about Julia Child, whom he views as a “natural-born blogger,” even though she wrote before the blogging era: [snip]. A blogger is someone who takes matters into his or her own hands. Someone who sees a problem that no one is trying to solve, one that desperately needs solving, that begs to be solved, and because the tools are so inexpensive that they no longer present a barrier, they are available to the heroic individual. As far as I can tell, Julia Child was just such a person. Blogging software didn’t exist when she was pioneering, but it seems that if it did she would have used it.” In the same piece, he also mentions that “The story of the nobility of blogging largely remains, imho, untold,”
    • Hello… I Must Be Going-allaboutjazz.com -
      “You are all the victims of Big Lies, conceived by Big Liars and spread by small-time hustlers, self-seeking weasels, Kulchur pimps and self-loathing whores – with a little too much help from some truly dedicated and optimistic individuals who are simply unable to see the forest for the trees. Combine this with those most willing victims – the musicians, who insist upon remaining slaves, shackled by their comfortable ignorance, short-sightedness and willingness to plant their silent lips upon the glutes of anybody who can offer them the luxury of allowing them to work for chump change – and you have got the ideal formula for destruction.”
    • 20 years goes by so quickly – NetNewMusic -
      “As in Dan Stearns recent Trolley video, this video is music from twenty years ago from a group I was in called the Glue Factory Orchestra in one of our first, if not our first show. The auspicious title of “no name” goes with this tune. As you can tell, the video and audio aren’t the best, but the club Beneath Broadway was a great place to play and to see music and theatre and this reminds me of those days. GFO was: Tony Atherton (alto sax), Diane Barkauskas (keyboard, accordion), Dave Black (amplified string bass), Joe Bouchard (Guitar), Jeff Fairbanks (drums, marimba), Martin Tardif (electric bass), and Jerry Wheeler (trombone). Tune by Jeff Fairbanks”

    Bookmarks for December 11th through December 17th [del.icio.us]

    Bookmarks for December 11th through December 17th [del.icio.us]

    Bookmarks from December 11th through December 17th:[del.icio.us]

    • ‘Wire’ A Study Topic At Colleges – Baltimore Sun – [del.icio.us]
    • “We did not design the show purely as an entertainment, but as a political treatise and social critique,” he wrote in an e-mail to The Baltimore Sun. “To the extent that academia has found the work and is intent on extending the discussion, we are, of course, pleased.” Simon said he’s also happy that the social themes he worked into the series will be getting more attention – themes including “the fraud of the drug war, the evisceration of the working class, our inability to reform our political infrastructure, the inequality of educational opportunity and, lastly, the declining ambitions and viability of high-end journalism.”
    • Los Angeles News – Truck vs. Church and State: Kogi Bites Back – page 1 -
      “Wow! Little did our Squid Ink food blog editor, Amy Scattergood, know what she was getting into when she asked Church and State chef Walter Manzke a simple question, “Is there anything you won’t eat?” Manzke answered thusly and in the process set off a mini commentary storm: “Anything off a truck. L.A. seems to get caught up in these trends, when one person has great success with something and then no one can come up with anything new so they just copy it. And the most ridiculous one seems to be the truck. I mean, it was maybe cool when the first person did it, and it fits the economy because it’s cheap to operate and all that, but I think it’s everything that takes away from the purpose, the enjoyment and the passion of eating.”
    • Scott Brown on Film Reviews Written Before Cameras Roll | Magazine
      “Can we talk about how much the new Cameron Crowe movie sucks? I mean, seriously, what was going on with that freakin’ volcano? And all that nonsense about the Chinese antisatellite device? And hoo-boy, that far-fetched third-act turn — oh, hang on. You haven’t seen the movie? No worries, neither have I. Neither has anyone. It hasn’t actually been made yet — but the reviews are already in at Scriptshadow. A no-frills Hollywood blog, Scriptshadow is diabolically simple: An anonymous figure who goes by the nom de Net of Carson Reeves harvests scripts from a network of industry contacts (including hype-conscious writers and their reps). He reviews the screenplays, critiquing structure, story, and character development …”
    • Judge denies awarding $391,150 to teacher’s defense team | court, corbett, attorneys – News – The Orange County Register -
      “Corbett, an Advanced Placement European history teacher at Capistrano Valley High School in Mission Viejo, was found to have violated the First Amendment’s establishment clause when he referred to Creationism as “religious, superstitious nonsense” during a fall 2007 classroom lecture.” don’t you think this might have a chilling effect of “free speech”
    • Facebook is the new Compuserve -
      “The real concern is that we share so much behind the closed doors of Compuserve-esque Web “sites” that serve as Hotel Californias for our content. Yes, I want to keep some conversations private, but as more of my ramblings move to Facebook and other closed corners of the Web, I want to broaden the conversation beyond the borders of my “friends” list. I can’t. I’m stuck. What happens on Facebook, stays on Facebook. Even content that is cross-posted elsewhere: the ensuing commentary (often of equal or greater value to the original post) is trapped. Professor Jonathan Zittrain raises a warning voice about this in his “The Future of the Internet and How to Stop It”, but I can’t help but think that the convenience of Facebook will trump the social benefits of broadening conversations beyond the borders of such services.”
    • Jazz: The Music of Unemployment: How saving a farming village from bandits in feudal Japan is like being in a big band circa 2009 -
      “Because good musicians playing in a big band are like samurai deigning to fight without hope of glory, of course. They have to really love what they do, and they have to be willing to be paid in rice if need be.”
    • Logic made fun A new comic romps through one of philosophy’s greatest debates -
      “What “Logicomix” niftily demonstrates is how well the graphic novel form is suited to mounting sprightly explanations of abstract concepts. Thinkers often employ concrete metaphors as tools to convey difficult ideas — the “infinite hotel” of mathematician David Hilbert, for example, an establishment that, although full, always has room for another guest. In “Logicomix,” Hilbert’s paradox is further visualized by a character checking into an actual hotel and drawing arrows on the posted floor plan. That character is the British philosopher Bertrand Russell, and the scene is played for laughs with Russell’s bemused new bride shaking her head and a German porter exclaiming “They are crazy, these Britons!”
    • In search of Eva Tanguay, the first rock star. – By Jody Rosen – Slate Magazine -
      “To call Tanguay a “rock star” is anachronistic but appropriate. She was not just the pre-eminent song-and-dance woman of the vaudeville era. (One of her many nicknames was “The Girl Who Made Vaudeville Famous.”) She was the first American popular musician to achieve mass-media celebrity, with a cadre of publicists trumpeting her on- and offstage successes and outrages, and an oeuvre best summed up by the slogan that appeared frequently on theatrical marquees: “Eva Tanguay, performing songs about herself.” She was the first singer to mount nationwide solo headlining tours, drawing record-breaking crowds and shattering box-office tallies from Broadway to Butte. Newspaper accounts describe scenes of fan frenzy that foreshadowed Frank Sinatra at the Paramount Theatre and Beatlemania. At the height of her stardom, Tanguay commanded an unheard of salary, $3,500 per week, out-earning the likes of Al Jolson, Harry Houdini, and Enrico Caruso. “
    • Giving tourists a look at gang culture — latimes.com -
      “A group of civic activists, united by faith and a belief that the poor economy in the interior of Los Angeles is a social injustice, is preparing to offer bus tours of some of the grittiest pockets of the city, including decayed public housing, sites of deadly shootouts and streets ravaged by racial unrest. After a VIP preview last weekend, L.A. Gang Tours expects to open to the public in January, giving tourists a look at the cradle of the nation’s gang culture — the birthplace of many of the city’s gangs, including Crips and Bloods, Florencia 13 and 18th Street.”

    Bookmarks for November 10th through November 16th [del.icio.us]

    Bookmarks for November 10th through November 16th [del.icio.us]

    Bookmarks from November 10th through November 16th:[del.icio.us]

    • I dreamed the press would be forgiving – Life’s a Pitch -”Due to the high price point of this box set we will only be able to send out review copies on loan on a case by case basis and will not be able to provide any contest copies. However, we can do contests using single disc bundles from the box set. Please let me know if you would like to run a contest. I have also included a widget below which includes a video describing the box set. … PS. Because there are no review copies we are allowing members of the media to purchase Outside The Box at the wholesale cost $475. Let me know if you are interested. Bold. Call. I understand the loan thing, but the “wholesale” cost? Is that almost insulting, or is it just me? I can’t imagine someone from the classical music press in 2009 paying $475 for a review copy, unless he or she was going to turn around and sell it on eBay for a profit. Which would probably make them more than their paper would pay for the review itself! “
    • Greg Mitchell: The Great Atomic Film Cover-Up -
      “In the weeks following the atomic attacks on Japan 64 years ago, and then for decades afterward, the United States engaged in airtight suppression of all film shot in Hiroshima and Nagasaki after the bombings. This included footage shot by U.S. military crews and Japanese newsreel teams. In addition, for many years, all but a handful of newspaper photographs were seized or prohibited. The public did not see any of the newsreel footage for 25 years, and the U.S. military film remained hidden for nearly four decades. I first probed the coverup back in 1983 in Nuclear Times magazine (where I was editor), and developed it further in later articles and in my 1995 book with Robert Jay Lifton, Hiroshima in America and in a 2005 documentary Original Child Bomb. To see some of the footage, go to my blog. “
    • Michael Kaiser: Does the Symphonic Orchestra Model Work? -
      “One of the Fellows participating in the Kennedy Center Arts Management Institute raised a serious question with me: can the traditional model of a symphony orchestra work in the United States? He observed that salaries are very high for musicians, conductors and guest artists, and ticket demand is not strong enough to cover most of these costs. High ticket prices are stifling that demand and contributions will continue to have to grow very rapidly to cover inflation. I cannot argue with this analysis. Somehow the cost structure for American orchestras has risen to the point that every orchestra is likely to struggle to make ends meet.”
    • The McSweeney’s Effect « Mark Athitakis’ American Fiction Notes -
      “[I]t does this incredible thing for people like me, or people like me five years ago if that makes sense. Because a lot of publishers, for reasons of legitimacy, feel the need to include big writers. Or maybe it’s not even for legitimacy, maybe it’s just to put names on the front cover that will sell. And usually, to be honest, it’s the crummier work from those writers. They rarely, if ever, take risks on folk who they’ve never heard of. You might not have heard of them as the reader, but it’s almost always someone on the magazine who knew someone, someone’s old professor makes a call and gets the story in.”
    • Art review: ‘Collection: MOCA’s First Thirty Years’ | Culture Monster | Los Angeles Times -
      “But this is not just a promotional treasure-house show. Installed chronologically by chief curator Paul Schimmel, it also tells a story — although one that’s rarely heard. The postwar rise of American art is paired with the simultaneous rise of Los Angeles, from shallow backwater to cultural powerhouse. At the Grand Avenue building, which spans 1939 to 1979, the distinctive emergence of a mature L.A. art is embedded within the larger postwar prominence of the United States, artistically dominated by New York. At the Geffen — the story picks up in the year MOCA was born. Two telling works flank the Grand Avenue entry. At the left, a lovely little 1939 abstraction by Piet Mondrian signals Modernism’s shift from Europe to America as war loomed. At the right is Sam Francis’ luminous cloud of gray-white color, painted in postwar Paris in 1951 as an atmospheric evocation of urban light. Francis later moved to Santa Monica and served as a founding MOCA trustee.”
    • The Hundred Greatest Quotes From “The Wire” In Ten Minutes (VIDEO)
      “The Wire” was arguably the best show to ever grace our televisions and now an entrepreneurial fan has strung together all the best lines from its five seasons into one ten-minute video. Omar, Bubbles, Bunk, McNulty, Rawls, Stringer, Avon, Snoop, Marlo, Cheese, Prop Joe, Clay Davis and more are immortalized for their funniest and most poignant lines. “
    • The Source » Twitter users weigh in on the Gold Line Eastside Extension
      “Six years ago when the Gold Line to Pasadena opened there was no Twitter. Today on the first day of revenue service for the new Gold Line Eastside extension, L.A.’s first light rail since then, Twitter is a global phenomenon. Angelenos are taking advantage of the technology to share their feelings about the extension in 140 character blips. I counted over 300 tweets referencing the Gold Line during yesterdays grand opening and the tweets continue today as revenue service gets underway. Early Sunday morning, Twitter users were sharing their anticipation for the day:…”
    • John Cage Visualization on Vimeo -
      “Kinetic typography sketch using an excerpt from Indeterminacy 136 and a section from Tossed as it is Untroubled, both by John Cage. The typefaces are Serifa and Bookman Old Style. The animation is done in AfterEffects.”
    • Disquiet » Keith Fullerton Whitman Live at Root Strata’s On Land Festival (AIFF)

      “Back in September, the first On Land festival brought a wide range of quiet-minded electronicists and other music-makers to San Francisco. I caught the first of the three concerts, which were conceived by the Root Strata record label, but unfortunately for me not the one featuring a solo performance by Boston-based musician Keith Fullerton Whitman. Of course, missed concert opportunities aren’t what they once were. Chances are, someone recorded what you didn’t witness — sometimes even the musicians themselves. And fortunately in this case, Whitman has just uploaded a high-quality recording of the nearly 20-minute set to his soundcloud.com/kfw space:”

    Bookmarks for October 24th through October 31st [del.icio.us]

    Bookmarks for October 24th through October 31st [del.icio.us]

    Bookmarks from October 24th through October 31st:[del.icio.us]

    • Brow Beat : The DORF Matrix: Towards a Theory of NPR’s Taste in Black Music -
      “In the weeks since the publication of the All Songs Considered list, I have been puzzling over NPR’s musical coverage—in particular, its approach to black music. I wondered: Could NPR’s musical taste be as lily-white as the “The Best Music of 2009 (So Far)” list? After scouring NPR’s Web site and studying its broadcasts—All Things Considered profiles, Fresh Air interviews, even the music interludes played between segments on NPR’s marquee programs—I can report that the answer is no. It’s not that NPR doesn’t like black music. It merely maintains a strict preference for black music that few actual living African-Americans listen to.”
    • why i’m not afraid to take your money« by amanda fucking palmer -
      “I know this for myself – it’s something you’ve done since you were six years old, and there’s a sense that if you stop giving 100% you are doomed to failure, and that is unacceptable. No wonder so many players hate their sport – the surprise is that so few admit it.” And despite all the kudos, money and silverware, there’s a reason it’s the top players who suffer most – because they’re the ones playing the most tennis, as they don’t get knocked out in the first or second round. So they have the least free time, the most mental stress and suffer the most physically. Agassi’s avowed hatred for his sport is far from exclusive to tennis. British cyclists Chris Boardman, the former Olympic pursuit champion, and Tour de France star David Millar have both admitted to not really liking cycling. “In Boardman’s case,” says William Fotheringham, the Guardian’s cycling correspondent, “he liked the winning not the cycling itself, and he drove himself to win.”
    • Why did Andre Agassi hate tennis? | Sport | The Guardian -
      “I know this for myself – it’s something you’ve done since you were six years old, and there’s a sense that if you stop giving 100% you are doomed to failure, and that is unacceptable. No wonder so many players hate their sport – the surprise is that so few admit it.” And despite all the kudos, money and silverware, there’s a reason it’s the top players who suffer most – because they’re the ones playing the most tennis, as they don’t get knocked out in the first or second round. So they have the least free time, the most mental stress and suffer the most physically. Agassi’s avowed hatred for his sport is far from exclusive to tennis. British cyclists Chris Boardman, the former Olympic pursuit champion, and Tour de France star David Millar have both admitted to not really liking cycling. “In Boardman’s case,” says William Fotheringham, the Guardian’s cycling correspondent, “he liked the winning not the cycling itself, and he drove himself to win.”
    • don’t care about old composers-rogerbourland.com -
      “I asked Aaron Copland what he was composing in fall 1976: “Nothing, and I am not accepting commissions; if people want to play my music, there’s plenty of it available in my catalog.” Today I went through an old journal, listing old UCLA Music faculty and their appointments and salaries. I looked at all the composers and saw their careers over a span of decades. I sighed and thought about how none of their music is heard these days. And I’m sure that this is true for every music school in America.”
    • Brand (Dis)Loyalty « The Quick and the Ed -
      “A couple of days ago a message popped up on my Tivo informing me of a new service, “Blockbuster on Demand.” Ah, Blockbuster. That takes me back, to that period of about four years when all of the mom and pop video rental stores had been driven out of business but Netflix hadn’t yet arrived, so the only way to rent a movie was to drive to the nearest Blockbuster, spend ten minutes trying to find a place to park, discover that your first eight choices were unavailable, wait in line for fifteen minutes, and be informed by a surly, inattentive clerk that you owed the Blockbuster corporation 27 dollars in late fees and other assorted charges. snip This is what happens when organizations use their monopoly status to mistreat customers. Sooner or later the world changes, your monopoly is gone, and you pay the price… If there’s one thing that’s pretty certain, it’s that people will have more education choices in the future than they’ve had in the pas
    • Music review: ‘Einstein’ at the beach | Culture Monster | Los Angeles Times -
      So “Baby Einstein” won’t make your kids smarter after all. Last week, the Walt Disney Co. confessed that plopping kids in front of its video does not count as instant education and offered to refund gullible parents their money. But the few enlightened parents who tried “Einstein on the Beach” instead may have a wiser tale to tell. Saturday night, Jacaranda, the West Side’s new music series, concluded its first concert of the season at First Presbyterian Church of Santa Monica with excerpts from Philip Glass’ groundbreaking opera he conceived with director Robert Wilson in 1976. Glass offers the option of replacing the women’s voices at the end with a children’s chorus and that is what Jacaranda did. Asking youngsters to show up late at night to sing the last eight minutes of a five-hour avant-garde work is, obviously, unreasonable. Then again, little about putting on “Einstein on the Beach” has ever been practical…”


    Bookmarks for October 16th through October 22nd [del.icio.us]

    Bookmarks for October 16th through October 22nd [del.icio.us]

    Bookmarks from October 16th through October 22nd:[del.icio.us]

    • Space, movement and Rudy Perez — latimes.com -
      “The Times cited Perez as “the conscience of Los Angeles dance.” That he continues choreographing is something of a minor miracle. Not only is the arts economy dire, but Perez also has been visually impaired for the last decade. Moving slowly and burdened with hazy vision at best, Perez says the work keeps him going. The Armory engagement is particularly meaningful, because it was there, in 1992, that the Center first presented “The Dance-Crazy Kid From New Jersey Meets Hofmannsthal.” clip “The site-specific concert is dedicated to Cunningham, who died in July at age 90. It features two works with original music by longtime collaborator Steve Moshier, performed live by the composer and his Liquid Skin Ensemble.”
    • WitnessLA.com » Blog Archive » The Arrest of Alex Sanchez – Part 5: A Game Changer?- UPDATED -
      “FIRST LET’S RECAP THE BACK STORY: Alex Sanchez is the El Salvadoran-born, former MS-13 gang member who transformed his life to become a nationally respected gang intervention leader. Sanchez founded and is the executive director of Homies Unidos, and has been praised in cities across the country as someone who has helped turn around the lives of many, many young men and women. Then this past June, Alex was arrested by the FBI as part of a federal racketeering indictment and accused of plotting the murder of another gang member among other charges. It was not that the Feds accused Sanchez of shooting anyone himself, or personally dealing in drugs and guns. Worse, the indictment maintained that Sanchez is a shot caller—AKA a leader—of a particular clique of MS-13 who ordered such things done. He was, said the Feds, leading a double life and had successfully pulled the moral and psychological wool over the eyes of his myriad friends, admirers and supporters…”
    • Big teaching cuts this week at CSUF – College Life OC – OCRegister.com -
      “Faculty at Cal State Fullerton will be on furlough Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday of this week as part of a larger move by the California State University system to save hundreds of millions of dollars to help balance the state budget.” The furloughs will affect thousands of students and hundreds of professors and lecturers at Orange County’s largest university, and will be followed on Friday by a general furlough for management and staff workers who aren’t on the faculty.
    • Là ci darem la mano- A Conversation October 18, 2009 -
      “Joe: seems weird to me that the entire genre of classical music is being portrayed as this sort of backwards, insecure entity it seems to me that the person who wrote it comes from the point of view of an outsider me: yeah except she doesn’t, i mean she knows classical music pretty well Joe: I’ve learned from the school that musical taste is extremely personal and if there are overall “musical trends” it’s more a result of music that either appeals to everybody by being kind of soul-less or music that captures the thinking of a particular time period to me, the 21st century is tech-obsessed, and preoccupied with nostalgia and particularly reworking the classics so these musical trends don’t surprise me at all. They’re just a product of the times…” …. Joe: it’s not new me: but 1. none of these artists are new they’ve been around Joe: though to some it may be great… … me: there’s no angle on this article that makes me care. none of the content or position is interesting”
    • The Random Band Game – ConceptArt.org Forums -
      This is incredibly fun and addicting… 1 – Go to “wikipedia.” Hit “random” or click http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special:Random The first random wikipedia article you get is the name of your band. 2 – Go to “Random quotations” or click http://www.quotationspage.com/random.php3 The last four or five words of the very last quote of the page is the title of your first album. 3 – Go to flickr and click on “explore the last seven days” or click http://www.flickr.com/explore/interesting/7days Third picture, no matter what it is, will be your album cover. 4 – Use photoshop or similar to put it all together.
    • LA Eastside » Target’s humorous “illegal alien” costume -
      ‘Dear Target, What’s up with this “Illegal Alien” costume? I don’t get why a corporation that boasts about giving back to the community (can’t say I didn’t thoroughly enjoy the ¡Bienvenido Dudamel! concert a few weeks ago) and celebrates Nuestra Gente would sell such a despicable costume. (I know not all undocumented immigrants are Latino, but we do make up a plurality of the population.) Is it to make a buck? Is that enough to alienate (no pun intended) undocumented immigrants, their allies and our dollars? Couldn’t you make a buck by not selling “humorous costumes” that demean and make light of the situation faced by many undocumented immigrants and advance dehumanizing language? Is it humorous that thousands die trying to cross the US/Mexico border? Between 1998-2004 1,954 migrants died on the perilous journey north source). Since 2004, the Arizona Star Border Death Database has recorded 1,193 deaths at the border. Funny, no? ¡Chistoso!”
    • Artists Paid-Spotify -
      “I love Spotify as much as the next music fan, but its struggle to extract value is in danger of becoming a spectacle. To consumers it’s a miracle, to the industry it’s a problem to be solved. The strategy looks right – drive a developing ad-products business as much as possible, while trying to upscale users to a pay model for a better experience. It has to be the test case and I would strongly argue, deserves all the help it can get from its music partners. We need to begin to realise though, Spotify’s potential. It has the potential to generate revenues equivalent to a large niche, while at the same time eating further into CD revenues. This is the future music market – fragmentation into a number of niches.”

    Bookmarks for August 23rd through August 29th [del.icio.us]

    Bookmarks for August 23rd through August 29th [del.icio.us]

    Bookmarks from August 23rd through August 29th:[del.icio.us]

    • How To: Find Out How Much Your Insurer Sucks -”When you’re shopping for an insurance company, check the insurer’s complaint record — especially if it’s a small insurer that’s offering a good rate, but you haven’t heard much about its reputation. Saving a few dollars per year in premiums can backfire if the insurer hassles you at claim time.” To access this information, go to the National Association of Insurance Commissioners’ Consumer Information Source. Type in the name of the company, the state where you live and the type of insurance. (Under “statement type” and “business type,” click on “property/casualty” for home and auto insurance or “life, accident and health.”) The site then provides the insurer’s national complaint statistics.
    • The Industrial Jazz Group » Put Another Nickel In -”Donate $50,000, and get a copy of the new CD, the high five, the shout-out, the photo, the bit part, the personal liner note “thank you,” plus my Volvo Station Wagon, a historic vehicle which was used in seven IJG tours on the west coast (and which still displays some of the wear and tear from same).”
    • Stew is still stewing over L.A.’s snub of ‘Passing Strange’ — latimes.com -”When were we going through the classic L.A. club grind,” he begins, speaking of his days this decade with the Negro Problem, “at a certain point, we were selling out Spaceland like you’re supposed to do. But when we didn’t get handed the brass ring of the major label deal and we didn’t get handed the brass ring of the hip, indie label deal, it was like a lot of the powers that be were sort of looking at us like . . . ‘what good are you guys?’ “
    • School board approves plan to open up schools to outsiders — latimes.com -”The Los Angeles Board of Education voted today to open up 250 schools, including 50 new multimillion-dollar campuses, to outside charter operators and others. The move came after a nearly four-hour debate on a 6-1 vote, with board member Marguerite Poindexter LaMotte opposing. Under the proposal by board member Yolie Flores Aguilar, nonprofit charter groups and the mayor’s group that oversees 11 schools could compete for the chance to run these schools. Ultimately, it will be up to Supt. Ramon C. Cortines to select the winning bid for these campuses. Labor unions were especially opposed to the plan, with teachers union head A.J. Duffy saying the district needs to be collaborative if it wants to reform schools.”
    • Dream of a Common Language. Sueño de un Idioma Común.: Texas Monthly September 2009 -”In traditional bilingual classes, learning English is the top priority. The ultimate aim is to move kids out of non-English-speaking classrooms as quickly as possible. Students in dual language classes, on the other hand, are encouraged to keep their first language as they learn a second. And Ysleta’s program, called two-way dual language, is even more radical, because kids who speak only English are also encouraged to enroll. Everyone sits in the same classroom. Spanish-speaking kids are expected to help the English speakers in the early grades, which are taught mostly in Spanish. As more and more English is introduced into the classes, the roles are reversed. Even the teachers admit it can look like chaos to an outsider. “Dual language classes are very loud,” said Steven Vizcaino, who was an early student in the program and who graduated from Del Valle High in June. “Everyone is talking to everyone.”
    • Part 1: iTunes and the pen | theCLog -”What about all those other authors out there, banging away on their keyboards, giving life to characters, and telling stories that resonate in the lives of their readers? Do they need music to work? Is it simply a background, or does it find a way into their words? It wasn’t really a surprise to find a lot of the writers I spoke with had similar, lyric-less requirements when it comes to their own writing habits.”
    • Alexey Steele, Classical Underground impresario — latimes.com – scott timburg on alexey steele’s los angeles classical underground series “Certainly, at the Classical Underground concerts, art and music seem vital indeed. Not only for the audience, but for the players. The August concert included an austere, resonant Bach Cello Suite, a Prokofiev piano sonata rendered with sterling clarity by a pianist raising money for her CD release, and several melodic pieces by lesser-known composers. Afterward, many of the musicians came back and played; the cellist improvised on Bach. (Some nights, these after parties go until dawn.) “I don’t play it! I don’t know notes!” Steele exclaims. “I didn’t get one music lesson in my life! And I need it. I’m proof that people need it. I’m living proof that classical music lives!”

    Bookmarks for the week: June 22nd through June 26th [del.icio.us];

    Bookmarks from June 22nd through June 26th:[del.icio.us]