Posts Tagged ‘music’

Bookmarks for June 7th through June 12th

Bookmarks for June 7th through June 12th

These are my links for June 7th through June 12th: Class, power & ideology – – the illusion of control causes people to over-estimate the chances of them escaping the working class through their own efforts, and so under-estimate the importance of collective class action . – the in-group heterogeneity bias (which is the flipside […]


Bookmarks for May 23rd through May 29th

Bookmarks for May 23rd through May 29th

These are my links for May 23rd through May 29th: Last Night: Top 10 Quotes from KCRW’s Global Street Food Panel – “Some [trucks] are good, some are dreadful. I don’t think it’s accidental that most of the time when they have those competitions, the traditional loncheras win. Lux loncheras are catering to people who […]


Bookmarks for May 6th through May 10th

Bookmarks for May 6th through May 10th

These are my links for May 6th through May 10th: The first sign that humans are on the verge of evolving into another species [Evolution] – “What Carlson’s work suggests is that species whose brains are evolving fairly rapidly – hello, Homo sapiens – are likely candidates for speciation under the right circumstances. The key […]


Bookmarks for May 4th through May 6th 2011

Bookmarks for May 4th through May 6th 2011

These are my links for May 1st through May 6th 2011: Light rail and Leimert Park: MTA should bring a light-rail station to Leimert Park – latimes.com – RT @LATimescitydesk: Hector Tobar says it’s past time for LA transportation planners to do right by South LA: Money for Your Music: The Facts About Music Licensing […]


Bookmarks for May 1st through May 2nd

Bookmarks for May 1st through May 2nd

These are my links for May 1st through May 2nd: L.A. as foster city run by outsiders – "Something narrow and coarse in the imaginations of the McCourts and Zell and Selig and their business partners squeezed out any moral dimension to their deals or any feeling for Los Angeles. But to question how they […]


Bookmarks for April 30th through May 1st

Bookmarks for April 30th through May 1st

These are my links for April 30th through May 1st: 25 Abandoned Soviet Monuments that look like they’re from the Future | Crack Two – "These structures were commissioned by former Yugoslavian president Josip Broz Tito in the 1960s and 70s to commemorate sites where WWII battles took place (like Tjentište, Kozara and Kadinjača), or […]


Bookmarks from November 15th through November 20th 2010

Bookmarks from November 15th through November 20th 2010

“Some points to ponder: Do you make music with a venue, a context in mind? Do you create music for dive bars? Riverboats? Stadiums? Raves? Cars? iPods? Where is your music meant to be heard?” link: David Byrne Tells You Why You Probably Make Music For iPods : The New Rockstar Philosophy “The celebrities from […]


Bookmarks from October 24th through October 31st 2010

Bookmarks from October 24th through October 31st 2010

“I’ve been waiting to submit this update on the current state of tortas, but I was missing a 4th addition to the collection. Oh well, I’m gonna wing it. It’s not like it really matters, right? Just some arbitrary number I gave myself, which I can also ungive (?) at a moments notice. ‘Ta bien? […]


Bookmarks from August 2nd through August 8th 2010

Bookmarks from August 2nd through August 8th 2010

“Those common elements are even more noticeable — and funny — in this fan-made YouTube trailer for Paprika’s Inception. In this clever mash-up, Paprika’s images are matched with the Inception soundtrack and voice-over narration. The level of synchronicity between the two is pretty amazing. I’ve never heard Nolan talk about Paprika, and there are certainly […]


Bookmarks from Saturday June 13th-Friday June 18th 2010

Bookmarks from Saturday June 13th-Friday June 18th 2010

The Burger Lab: How to Make Perfect Thin and Crisp French Fries | A Hamburger Today

this looks awesome. DIY + nerd science!

It’s Complicated David Souter finally tells Americans to grow up.
“Souter’s speech thus represents much more than an ode to a changing Constitution or a forceful admission that something that sounds suspiciously like “empathy” means that “judicial perception turns on the experience of the judges, and on their ability to think from a point of view different from their own.” Souter’s words even transcend his own high-minded call to “keep the constitutional promises the nation has made.” What Souter asked Americans to do in his Harvard speech is to live with ambiguity. To, in his words, acknowledge that there is a “basic human hunger for the certainty and control that the fair-reading model seems to promise,” while recognizing, in Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes‘ formulation, that “certainty generally is illusion and repose is not our destiny.” He is telling us to stop dreaming of oracular judges with perfect answers to simple constitutional questions. He is telling us, in other words, to grow up.”

Does Professor Quality Matter? Evidence from Random Assignment of Students to Professors

“interestingly, they also find students whose professor had higher student evaluations typically did worse in subsequent courses. They attribute this to the “teaching to the test” that they think may go on in classes where professors have high student evaluations. Secondly, they find that students who took Calculus I from professors with lower student evaluations did better on subsequent courses. ”

The Civil War as Revenge of the Nerds – Personal – The Atlantic

“There’s a way of looking at the ugliness after Reconstruction–the rise of the Lost Cause, the Klan, the lynchings–as a tragic search for Southern white male identity. First the old slave patrols go. Then the Confederate Army is subdued and humiliated. Then blacks began to dominate “manly” athletic pursuits. Then Martin Luther King exposes the immorality of the Southern system. Reeling from “each successive volley, the Southern racist–and really any white racist–is left with a question: If the Southern white man is proven inferior physically, mentally, and even morally, than what is he?
HEY STOUFFERS! F$$K YOU IN YOUR F$$KING TOASTED A$$HOLE.

via . « Grocery Eats groceryeats.com post very NSFW (but very funny)

Almost All Is Vanity – PostClassic

“We have three markets. There’s a commercial market, entirely determined by huge corporations whose sole interest is money. We’re never going to make a dent in that one. There’s an orchestra-music circuit that you have to enter young, and it’s all about who you know, and the music sucks. And there’s an academic market, which demands a healthy respect for the Schoenberg line and a suspicion against anything populist. I and my 400 closest friends don’t fit any of these markets.”

“Success Is Just Another Form of Failure” – PostClassic
“The artists, on the other hand, are at a permanent disadvantage. The most creative of them cannot present their work with the kind of empirical verifiability that translates as prestige going up the ladder – except by winning awards administrated by other universities. And those who aim for and achieve any kind of popular or commercial success virtually negate the explicit aims of the institution.”



Cleaning Out the Garage

Cleaning Out the Garage

summer is here and i’m actually think it might be productive. it’s not like i don’t need the break, i’m just not that productive when i don’t have any real structure to my day. overall the last few years have been a little too much drama for me and it’s time to “get my house in order” (literally as well as figuratively).

1st up is cleaning out my garage and turning it into a rehearsal studio/performance space. over the last few years i have definitely outgrown my “office” and now that i’m teaching private students at the house i need a bigger space to work in. after editing and mixing three albums (not to mention most of the composing that i do at home)i also have to admit that i really need a change of scenery. even though i wasn’t writing that much music this past year i found it very hard to want to sit down at my desk to do anything creative so i ventured out anywhere i could think of as an alternative creative space (including different rooms in the house) and came to the conclusion that having a larger space in my garage should do the trick for now. it will also allow me to setup and properly practice with the all the gear i’m using with my “music for controllers” setup. instead making music through headphones i really have needed to spend the time figuring out how to play these pieces “live” and have come to realize it’s much more involved than when I just played trombone.

the main problem is getting a proper balance when you are mixing live acoustic instruments (trombone, voice) and controllers (kaossilator, drone/scruti box, buddha machine, ableton live, launchpad, etc…). i also have realized that mixing electric and acoustic instruments without sound reinforcement can be very a very disjointed listening experience in a live performance and in many ways my even though much of this music is not technically hard to perform my “practicing” centers around how to setup gear, mics, and amps which means that i have to pretty much be practicing/performing with a stereo/PA system to make my performances aurally make sense.

with all that being said (and after trying to mostly “practice” at other locations) the reality is that the setup and teardown of this technological spectacle (a few amps, mic/stand, laptop/keyboard stand/table, MOTU traveller(digital/audio interface), and 2 pedal boards) can take almost as long as the rehearsal so for the time being i’m going to be only performing solo or with whomever musicians that can make it to the 90042 for a weekly rehearsal.

after driving down to fullerton and back for the last 20 years for PBE and DIE rehearsals can really take it’s toll and at this point in my life i think it’s only natural to change things up and make music in a different way. to me it’s kinda funny b/c on one hand i know there are a lot of people who over the past few years have been introduced to my “Retrace Our Steps/PBE 1.0″ music who really wish i was making more music with the larger group and really like the strings/winds/rock band orchestration. there are also another group who have only seen the “PBE 2.0 rock band” (as we jokingly called it) and keep asking when that group is going to perform again.  all i can say is that part of making alt-classical music is not really having the control to make those choices which leaves me to make music with the equipment and musicians that are available (and not continually banging my trying to fit a round peg in a square hole)

the good news is that if all goes well I should be performing on a regular basis soon. when and if there will be a PBE 3.0 is yet to be seen.  right now one step at a time is fine with me.


Marching bands unite in tribute to Brandon Franklin, slain at 22 | – NOLA.com

Marching bands unite in tribute to Brandon Franklin, slain at 22 | – NOLA.com

i saw this video a week ago about a new orleans trombonist who was killed in an domestic dispute at his ex-girlfriends house.

Marching bands unite in tribute to Brandon Franklin, slain at 22 | – NOLA.com

it’s really sad and horrible and reading further introduced me to a whole new understanding of how the brass band culture and music education are intertwined in NOLA.

“Such large, ambitious marching bands have become a relative anomaly in a city famous for its second-lines, brass bands and musical luminaries, however. More than four years after Hurricane Katrina, band leaders say they are fighting to ensure the tradition thrives in a dramatically altered public school landscape.”

obviously Katrina has made things more difficult, but not in ways you might think

“Several forces have depleted the ranks of the city’s marching bands. First, fewer students now live in the city, as the overall population has dropped since Katrina. And several high schools with vibrant marching bands, including Kennedy High School near the lakefront, did not reopen after the storm.Moreover, the city’s public high schools tend to be much smaller than before the storm. And many remain in a state of flux as some of the low-performing schools phase out grade by grade, with new programs taking their place.”

|snip|

…”Carnival parades are required by law to feature at least seven marching bands, a tradition that has helped foster a vibrant band culture at many of the city’s schools for decades.“Hopefully, in the very, very near future we can get more students from the middle schools and junior highs to come in and help bring our programs alive,” said Keith Thomas, the new band director at John McDonogh High School.John McDonogh’s band will not march this year, giving Thomas time to recruit new members and better prepare the current musicians.“They are just not ready to be on the street yet,” he said.Thomas noted that many students lost sight of the tradition after so much personal turmoil, including the post-storm scattering of relatives, mentors and band leaders who inspired many children to pick up an instrument in the first place.“We have kids who really don’t know what they want to do,” he said. “One day they want to march and the next day they don’t. You’ve got to sell it. You’ve got to make them believe in the program.”

link: New Orleans Mardi Gras marching bands are incubators for more than music | – NOLA.com

you learn more about brandon and his TBC brass band via

http://fromthemouthpieceonback.com/



Twitter Weekly Updates for 2010-05-30

Twitter Weekly Updates for 2010-05-30
  • my early impressions of being an iPad test monkey http://bit.ly/aUmKP2 #
  • My Top 3 Weekly #lastfm artists: Death Cab for Cutie (11), Aimee Mann (9) and LCD Soundsystem (7) #mm http://bit.ly/aTA338 #
  • Unintentional Exhibit A in the Case Against Academia http://is.gd/cdcNr #
  • my early iPad review http://bit.ly/aUmKP2 #
  • whatever you do, don’t drunk dial FreedomWorks (VIDEO) http://huff.to/b5BpJz #
  • if south pasadena is such a great place to live, why do i have to pay them with a check for my water bill? #fb #luddite #
  • according to yelp it looks like I’m about to experience the world’s most amazing torta http://www.yelp.com/biz/chago-ahogadas-los-angeles #
  • LA Helicopter Tour: Complete Round Trip – a set on Flickr http://bit.ly/brdzWP via @atwatervillagenewbie #
  • anybody else think jesse’s speech about woodship on ‘breaking bad’ was a callback to anthony michael hall’s in ‘the breakfast club’? #fb #
  • “don’t worry about who you are, get rid of who your not, and the rest will take care of itself” – Image by… http://tumblr.com/xvxa3bs7s #
  • via http://www.lewiz.org: Chrome Incognito Tracks Visited Siteshttp://bit.ly/9UmV0w #notsoprivate #fb #
  • i wonder how long it’s going to be until somebody does an ebook of the month club? #fb #
  • The Proto iPad (in 1988) http://bit.ly/cUVrWj #
  • enjoyed improving out ideas on iPad with @patterngrid this morning. don’t mind cheesy sounds (imagination!) but wish it could record #fb #
  • improvised this on the train this morning using PatternGrid on the iPad.”it looks like it’s going to work out” http://db.tt/T0LnHP #fb #
  • “The rahbar basically told Obama to go fuck himself, didn’t he?” said my South Tehran friend, a little…” http://tumblr.com/xvxa413t5 #
  • “it looks like it’s going to work out” (2010) http://bit.ly/d8umts music made using @PatternMusic on iPad #
  • last day of commuting via train this semester :( #fb #
  • just realized that simplenote is integrated with text-expander on the iPhone/iPad. Double Frakking Nerd Woot! #fb #
  • The Attempting-to-be-Complete guide/review of bike commuting with a string instrument. (what about a trombone?) http://is.gd/cgmtd #fb #
  • “The real you is dying and this thing that’s created is now going to be representative of you. And every…” http://tumblr.com/xvxa5dhe9 #
  • RT NEW SONG WITH HEINALI http://tumblr.com/xmda53bvv /via @finneyerkes (btw Unbookable is a great name for a musicians blog) #
  • “It is widely thought not: Because various dates are fixed in our written Constitution, Americans have…” http://tumblr.com/xvxa5mhvc #
  • i don’t think composers will be replaced by computers anytime soon, but journalists i’m not so sure about (via Slate) http://bit.ly/bW9kIJ #
  • Video: Boing Boing exclusive: trailer for Winnebago Man documentary – Boing Boing http://tumblr.com/xvxa5z5sp #
  • think the wired.com wiki’s are pretty cool, but what happens to them when wired goes under? same for all these other ‘DIY services’ #fb #
  • I think i found a new twist in place of our monthly ‘Risk’ game: War on Terror, the board game http://instapaper.com/zw312xbD #fb #
  • Photo: The dog that hasn’t missed a single riot for years » This Blog Rules | Why go elsewhere? via samuel… http://tumblr.com/xvxa6z82y #
  • more end of semester thoughts on music theory: answering “the why” http://bit.ly/bymVWo #
  • Introducing El Chavo – Meet Northeast LA’s only anarchist Huevos Ranchero’s Blogger Huevos Rancheros: Las… http://tumblr.com/xvxa77kd1 #
  • Craig Venter creates synthetic life form | Science | The Guardian
    (http://bit.ly/b7Pdxo) – http://www.guardian.co.uk @SkyGrid #
  • “Talent should be allowed to rise, but once risen it should be respected by those beneath it. The ideal…” http://tumblr.com/xvxa7hiye #
  • playing at Bordello 11pm tonight with the Ladies Auxiliary. this brass/accordian/violin/tenor drum mashup will make the angels cry #fb #
  • some youtube vlog called musicology, not sure why http://tumblr.com/xvxa8r56u #
  • fun show last night! now back to reality (finish grading finals, update resume, cleanup websites) #
  • “There is no gray area when it comes to street vendors. On one side of the coin you have the people who…” http://tumblr.com/xvxa8ymoa #
  • Printable WTFLOL sign via @stretta http://tumblr.com/xvxa94rcb #
  • “Even though these moneyed men may have been selfish schemers, nevertheless, the new government needed…” http://tumblr.com/xvxa98qox #
  • customizing a wordpress blog is like herding cats #
  • “Does open courseware mean we’ll be getting rid of professors? ” – › “Q: Does open courseware mean we’ll be… http://tumblr.com/xvxaaop23 #
  • “Certain self-created societies” were stirring up trouble everywhere. The insurrection, the president…” http://tumblr.com/xvxaazi8y #
  • saw the jung ‘red book’ & some art about art today at the hammer. 2nd rarely works and this time wasn’t any different #fb #
  • i’m amazed how racism and intolerance is being defended as a free speech issue « ANABlog http://instapaper.com/zm6ihib3 #fb #
  • via Peter Kirn | Create Digital Music » The Myth of Falling Fidelity, and Audio History Unburdened by Fact -… http://tumblr.com/xvxacg5fx #
  • “The United States would furnish the singular spectacle of a political society without sovereignty, or of…” http://tumblr.com/xvxacsj30 #
  • E-readers missing killer feature…and a solution. Keene on Tech (using evernote) http://bit.ly/b3NDkR #
  • “there must be some public fools who sacrifice private to public interest at the certainty of ingratitude…” http://tumblr.com/xvxadiuzb #
  • My Top 3 Weekly #lastfm artists: Paul Bailey (6), Metric (3) and Corey Dargel (2) #mm http://bit.ly/aTA338 #
  • Photo: negevrockcity: http://tumblr.com/xvxae3qm8 #
  • Munchie Box (tandoori chicken, doner kebab meat, pakora, fries and saladish mulch) food pr0n via Glasgow Scotland http://bit.ly/dkMbJ0 #
  • “But I think take back our country is a shibboleth for anxious white Americans who…” via composer John Adams http://bit.ly/d7l5uz #
  • just sent out an email updating the progress of my most recent recordings & reviews via my mailing list: subscribe via http://bit.ly/92gsmn #
  • Does Los Angeles have a conscience?

    Does it have a heart? : http://tumblr.com/xvxaej4ss #

  • “Indeed, it was often the difference between Jefferson’s impulsive opinions…”: via: Empire of Liberty http://tumblr.com/xvxaem63p #
  • the original home of chicken boy!: http://tumblr.com/xvxafzbp9 #
  • In Search of the Meaning of “Mozingo” | MetaFilter – Joe Mozingo had always been told that his family name… http://tumblr.com/xvxag12ww #
  • it’s the end of may so it must be time to sell the old gear to help fund the new. 12 hours in and already sold a camera and a guitar #fb #
  • Create Digital Music » Android 2.2: Badly-needed Improvements to Audio, Touch, More; What’s Missing (UPDATED)… http://tumblr.com/xvxagfozl #
  • Amazon Kindle Fails First College Test #Slashdot http://is.gd/cp5fb #
  • “Therefore he published a lengthy pamphlet laying out all the sordid details of the affair with Mrs….” http://tumblr.com/xvxagiug6 #
  • i wonder what guy debord would think of banksy’s ‘exit through the gift shop’? #fb #
  • trying to print usps labels in OSX and only option is IE8. i’d rather hand deliver the mail than install that steaming pile of code #fb #
  • i guess if i was using a linux box i would just have to send it by horse #
  • great story about what “who you know” really means in the music business | via Derek Sivers http://bit.ly/9iVQlX #fb #
  • Wired.com iPad app is shiny, but disappointing. why would I read articles that I couldn’t share, annotate, or link to? ‘exclusive… #fb #
  • … exclusive content is pretty, but not vital. if it’s not important enough for the original story, then why should I care? #fb #
  • Does Banksy’s Exit Through the Gift Shop mark the end of the street art movement? #SlateMagazine http://is.gd/cpWIq #
  • if you have an iphone why the need for a data plan when you can jailbreak and use tethering? I’m already paying $30 a … http://disq.us/dntqh #
  • “Either way, the syncing era is clearly on the wane. It seems likely that in a few years’ time, every…” http://tumblr.com/xvxai35qo #
  • Build a Chicken Coop – Wired How-To Wiki – I really like skimming wired’s wiki’s and on our last vacation the… http://tumblr.com/xvxaibp6i #
  • “The Revolution had been largely about securing the right of the natural aristocracy of talent to rule….” http://tumblr.com/xvxaidnx6 #
  • my birds act like they don’t notice, but I love how they come out and ‘play’ outside the cage whenever I’m in the room with them #fb #
  • scary that i been throwing all my scores from 09-10 in piles around the house. glad i found them all before i threw something out #fb #
  • The Bigger Picture: a end of the semester post for all of us tired teachers http://bit.ly/bViwf0 #
  • Architecture review: Renzo Piano’s Resnick Pavilion a reserved LACMA presence – latimes.com – “The pavilion’s… http://tumblr.com/xvxajz4iw #
  • Photo: toxicmarkers: http://tumblr.com/xvxalkib0 #
  • i thought AT&T’s cell phone service was bad in highland park, but they aren’t even trying in sylmar. really??? #fb #
  • Quote: via Empire of Liberty http://tumblr.com/xvxam425m #
  • “all notes must finish, like dying…” All the Mornings of the World (French, 1991) http://imdb.to/aL62Ti #fb #
  • “it’s every man for himself” In Remembrance of the Great Recession http://bit.ly/dvyyzY #
  • offroading in the forgotten trails of debs park http://tweetphoto.com/24631545 #
  • suck it risk! http://tweetphoto.com/24691420 #
  • up early and the ideas are flowing. looking forward to hanging at the ramen festival in Torrance with deb later today #fb #
  • 2nd time around i’m liking the $10 monthly rhapsody subscription service on the iPhone much better (especially with multitasking ;) #fb #
  • looking forward to when i can do this via youtube | how to replace your email responses with a very small shell script http://bit.ly/djSn5r #

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Bookmarks for Jan-Feb 2010 [Google Reader}

Bookmarks for Jan-Feb 2010  [Google Reader}

Bookmarks from Jan-Feb 2010 [Google Reader]
(just catching up, after moving my bookmarks from delicious to google reader)

  • Life, liberty and the pursuit of sanity – every thing you read in the mainstream media is true” “they call you sheeple” lol
  • DJ TechTools – “Little did G.C. Coleman know that his 5-second drum solo was going to spawn and influence multiple genres of music over the following forty years. In this first edition of DJ History, we are going to roll back the clock, open up DJ class and explore the mysteries of the Amen break, which has became a pivotal part of the dance music landscape. G.C. Coleman was the drummer for funk and soul outfit The Winstons’. In 1969 they released the single “Color Him Father,” which won the band a Grammy and broad critical acclaim. However, It was the B-side to the hit named “Amen, Brother” that would lead to the future evolution of dance music for decades to come. “Amen, Brother” was a quickly recorded B-side for The Winstons’ debut single.”
  • McSweeney’s Internet Tendency: Could It Be That the Best Chance to Save a Young Family From Foreclosure is a 28-Year-Old Pakistani American Playright-slash-Attorney who Learned Bankruptcy Law on the Internet? – “Could It Be That the Best Chance to Save a Young Family From Foreclosure is a 28-Year-Old Pakistani American Playright-slash-Attorney who Learned Bankruptcy Law on the Internet? Wells Fargo, You Never Knew What Hit You.”
  • What is Google Wave? | Business Center | Macworld – “Google describes Wave as “what e-mail would look like if it were invented today,” in the world of instant messaging, wikis, and online forums. But while the initial idea may have been to reinvent e-mail, in practice Wave is more akin to Google Docs than it is to Gmail. For example, how many times have you tried to develop a document through e-mail, with all those criss-crossing message threads clogging your inbox? Wave seeks to do away with that, by providing a single, hosted copy of a conversation that everyone can edit and discuss.”
  • BLOG.REPORTERWARSTORIES.COM: 1973: The Yom Kippur War; On The Benghazi Express; Meeting Idi Amin; Getting Strafed; Lunch with the Highjackers -”one of my favorite blogs. a lot of great behind the scenes shop top of “the story behind the story”
  • Expiration dates mean very little. – By Nadia Arumugam – Slate Magazine -”There’s a filet mignon in my fridge that expired four days ago, but it seems OK to me. I take a hesitant whiff and detect no putrid odor of rotting flesh, no oozing, fetid cow juice—just the full-bodied aroma of well-aged meat. A feast for one; I retrieve”
  • A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace – “Governments of the Industrial World, you weary giants of flesh and steel, I come from Cyberspace, the new home of Mind. On behalf of the future, I ask you of the past to leave us alone. You are not welcome among us. You have no sovereignty where we gather.”
  • National Geographic Magazine – NGM.com – “Yet Dharavi remains unique among slums. A neighborhood smack in the heart of Mumbai, it retains the emotional and historical pull of a subcontinental Harlem—a square-mile (three square kilometers) center of all things, geographically, psychologically, spiritually. Its location has also made it hot real estate in Mumbai, a city that epitomizes India’s hopes of becoming an economic rival to China. Indeed, on a planet where half of humanity will soon live in cities, the forces at work in Dharavi serve as a window not only on the future of India’s burgeoning cities, but on urban space everywhere.”
  • LA Eastside » The Mariachi-Oke Experiment con Trio Ellas – “Mariachi Plaza has been home to many troubadours, seeking to serenade the ears of passersby with their songs for sale. Across the way, this tradition has held true in the local neighborhood bar, Eastside Luv, a familiar and favorite spot of mine and many, away from the “Los Angeles” of late but with an added interactive twist to los Canciones de su Padre. For several months now, the barra monument to many things Mexican and Mexican American culture has been hosting “Mariachi-Oke!”  Yes, it is what it sounds like, and it is the first and third Sunday of every month. Patrons step on to the stage and attempt to belt out the ballads of Beltran, Negrete, Gabriel, and Fernandez without fear and hopefully, without forgetting the lyrics.  There are no bouncing balls highlighting the sing along words; it’s a sink or swim policy that ESL holds, which has filtered out the amateurs, but not always the hard of hearing.”
  • The Find: Magic Wok in Artesia – latimes.com – “Magic Wok is a porcine palace, a restaurant where the pillars of Filipino cooking are fortified by all things pork. Kids chomp on shards of pig skin as crisp as potato chips, grandparents leisurely ladle hunks of pork from sour tamarind soups — the homey restaurant went whole hog long before quivering cubes of pork belly cropped up on happy-hour menus and bacon became an almost de rigueur dessert.”
  • My Roger Ebert Story – Roger Ebert – Deadspin -Sir, Mr. Ebert, this is Will Leitch, an editor at the Daily Illini. I’ve had a bit to drikn and am going to just ask. There is an old story that you had sex on the EIC desk. Is that true? Everybody wants to knwo. Sorry for this.Best, Will”
  • The Find: The Slaw Dogs in Pasadena – latimes.com – “The Slaw Dogs is reimagining the humble hot dog with offerings such as a chicken Caesar salad dog, a Thai slaw dog and a Oaxacan dog.”
  • Los Angeles – “On a recent afternoon in the Eastside neighborhood of Lincoln Heights, Fay Green stands in the hallway of her apartment complex, which sits just feet above the bumper-to-bumper traffic of the I-5 freeway. A soft-spoken black woman, she lives with her five kids and one grandson in an urban planner’s idea of perfection: the dense, “Avenue 26″ master-planned community, touted by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and the city’s Department of Housing as an environmentally smart “transit-oriented development” in the city’s core, efficiently served by light rail.  From the outside, the stylish-looking village of 156 condos, called Puerta del Sol, and 378 other apartments squeezed between Avenue 26 and the thundering I-5 gives off a Crate & Barrel vibe. But Green’s four-bedroom unit, in the building dubbed Tesoro del Valle Family Apartments, is regularly dirtied by a heavy film of what she calls “dust.” She explains, “I clean the place up, and in two or three days, I have to wipe again.”
  • Peter Gabriel’s Scratch My Back is a most curious creation | Vancouver, Canada | Straight.com -”The new Peter Gabriel album—and what a rare phrase that has become!—is a most curious creation. An eclectic collection of covers from a fellow known for his original songwriting, it reimagines radio hits as modern-art music, full of shimmering orchestral effects and ethereal mood swings.”
  • The Mozart effect: Studies of music’s effect on children – latimes.com -”Even the author of the 1993 study that set off the commercial frenzy says her group’s findings — from an experiment that had college students, not babies, listen to Mozart — were “grossly misapplied and over-exaggerated.” Psychologist Frances Rauscher, along with the rest of the field studying music’s effects on the brain, has long since moved on to explore the effect of active musical instruction on cognitive performance.”
  • Well, This Employment Graph Is Just Terrifying – “This graph shows employment declines at the same chronological point during America’s last six recessions. Guess which one represents the current recession. Go ahead, guess. [New York Times(Thanks, Dan!)”
  • Los Angeles subway shots and Hollweird, CA – “i walk these all the time and have never seen them this way. great eye”
  • The New Commandments | Culture | Vanity Fair – “Thus we are fully entitled to consider them as a work in progress. May there not be some old commandments that could be retired, as well as some new ones that might be adopted? Taking the most celebrated Top 10 in order, we find (I am using the King James, or “Authorized,” version of the text):”
  • is there a trail? [Flickr] – “my flickr feed is randomly posting photo’s from this summer”

Bookmarks for January 12th through January 19th [del.icio.us]

Bookmarks for January 12th through January 19th [del.icio.us]

Bookmarks from January 12th through January 17th:[del.icio.us]

  • Brian Eno: “Recorded Music Equals Whale Blubber” – hypebot -
    “I think records were just a little bubble through time and those who made a living from them for a while were lucky. There is no reason why anyone should have made so much money from selling records except that everything was right for this period of time…” “It was a bit like if you had a source of whale blubber in the 1840s and it could be used as fuel. Before gas came along, if you traded in whale blubber, you were the richest man on Earth. Then gas came along and you’d be stuck with your whale blubber.” “Sorry mate – history’s moving along. Recorded music equals whale blubber. Eventually, something else will replace it.” – Brian Eno in The Guardian
  • THE KNIFE -
    “Commissioned by Danish performance group Hotel Pro Forma to write the music for their opera based on Charles Darwin and his book ‘On the Origin of the Species’, The Knife decided to make this a collaborative process, working with artists Mt. Sims and Planningtorock for the first time, to capture the huge width of the Darwin and evolution theme. They extensively researched Darwin related literature and articles, with Olof attending a field recording workshop in the Amazon to find inspiration and to record sounds. ‘Tomorrow, In A Year’ is a unique musical project. Richard Dawkins’s gene trees have formed the basis of some of the musical composition, artificial sounds have been mixed with field recordings, with the music inspired by everything from the different stages of a bird learning its melody, to a song based on Darwin’s loving letters about his daughter Anne. These are compositions that challenge the conventional conception of opera music.”
  • Thoughts on the Naughts:San Francisco Classical Voice -
    “Along with this development comes the emergence of “alt-classical” (alternative classical, an abbreviation with all the cachet of a computer key): This world of music existed for decades, but in the naughts (the decade of 2000–2009) it became newly visible thanks to decentralization and the lack of a dominant “mainstream” style in classical music. Imperfectly named, as is always the case with descriptive terms for large artistic phenomena, alt-classical represents the merging of genres of music, as well as the undermining of distinctions between “high” and “low,” classical and popular, along with an infusion of music formerly on the margins.”
  • Los Angeles News – 2009: ODE TO THE MUSIC MAN -
    “While most of this story’s respondents are Flaherty supporters, Paul Bailey, an adjunct professor of music education and theory at Cal State Fullerton (and one-time band director at John Marshall High School in Los Feliz), has this to say: “Talk about the forest for the trees: Teaching a drum line does not make a music program. I can easily see why an administration would reassign a music teacher (no matter how successful and well meaning) if they were unable and/or unwilling to field a marching band. Like it or not, the marching band is the most efficient way to get a large number of kids to participate in music. It’s unfortunate, but at the end of the day a music program should give musicians a variety of experiences and not focus on the specialized competitive agenda of one teacher.”
  • Facebook | Sahar Saedi: what do you think about the musicianship classes? -
    “I have had some really great professors both in csu fullerton and in el camino college and I feel that both of these schools which I have attended, have some very strong aspects to their music programs. However, I have one complain about the musicianship classes of both of these schools and I want to share it with you and ask for your insight. Unfortunately, in el camino college we had a very poor sightsinging class. There was absolutely no direction given to us as to how to learn to sightsing. We were given a few melodies that we would get tested on on our exam which by the time of the exam would basically be memorized, thus would not be sightsinging.”
  • Tom Swafford: Violinist, Composer, Arranger! -
    “My goal is to create clear music that communicates directly and genuinely. I don’t like slick music that has been edited and perfected artificially. I like all the subtle nuances, scratches, ‘mistakes’ that happen naturally and I think that this is a big part of what makes music expressive. “

Bookmarks for January 5th through January 11th [del.icio.us]

Bookmarks for January 5th through January 11th [del.icio.us]

Bookmarks from January 5th through January 11th:[del.icio.us]

  • Till we meet again, in some screening room in the dark. (15) – By Roger Ebert Slate Magazine -
    “To be fair, James Cameron undoubtedly knows this about genetics. We already know how the female Na’vi evolved breasts. They evolved them on Cameron’s drawing board, because you can’t have a love affair between two Na’vi who are both breastless and therefore apparently male. The bloggers from the tinfoil-hat brigade would really go bonkers then. Roger”
  • L.A. charter schools flex their educational muscles – latimes.com -
    “Bauer, the Granada Hills principal who wanted the district “leveled,” said he actually sees that happening — but from inside, and by the district’s own choice. “I think the current centralized L.A. Unified structure is being leveled by the superintendent and board,” he said. “I think the climate has changed a lot,” said Jennifer Epps, principal of , a high-performing elementary school in Historic South-Central. “I think that just overall, they’ve been realizing that what they’re doing isn’t necessarily right for every school . . . and they’re saying, ‘We don’t have the resources to change these schools fast enough. . . . We need other solutions.’ “
  • Quotes on music -
    “To those composers who use MIDI and drum machines: Keep using them! Realizing your scores via MIDI is not inherently better or worse than hearing them in your head. If you haven’t already, you will eventually figure out how to make your MIDI devices do things no one ever thought they would do! And then you might learn how to hear those kinds of things in your head, something that [the conductor] Dennis Russell Davies will never be able to do.” — Corey Dargel
  • The Founders Of Computer / Electronic Music | soundseller BLOG -
    “Six world-renowned pioneers of computer and electronic music gather at Tulane University to discuss the future of the form – both as they saw it in 1967 and as they see it today…”
  • Dave Winer: “I’m a mystic about What It All Means.” -
    “…Dave Winer’s writings make you “think.” What does this really mean? The best response comes from Winer himself in a remarkable note about Julia Child, whom he views as a “natural-born blogger,” even though she wrote before the blogging era: [snip]. A blogger is someone who takes matters into his or her own hands. Someone who sees a problem that no one is trying to solve, one that desperately needs solving, that begs to be solved, and because the tools are so inexpensive that they no longer present a barrier, they are available to the heroic individual. As far as I can tell, Julia Child was just such a person. Blogging software didn’t exist when she was pioneering, but it seems that if it did she would have used it.” In the same piece, he also mentions that “The story of the nobility of blogging largely remains, imho, untold,”
  • Hello… I Must Be Going-allaboutjazz.com -
    “You are all the victims of Big Lies, conceived by Big Liars and spread by small-time hustlers, self-seeking weasels, Kulchur pimps and self-loathing whores – with a little too much help from some truly dedicated and optimistic individuals who are simply unable to see the forest for the trees. Combine this with those most willing victims – the musicians, who insist upon remaining slaves, shackled by their comfortable ignorance, short-sightedness and willingness to plant their silent lips upon the glutes of anybody who can offer them the luxury of allowing them to work for chump change – and you have got the ideal formula for destruction.”
  • 20 years goes by so quickly – NetNewMusic -
    “As in Dan Stearns recent Trolley video, this video is music from twenty years ago from a group I was in called the Glue Factory Orchestra in one of our first, if not our first show. The auspicious title of “no name” goes with this tune. As you can tell, the video and audio aren’t the best, but the club Beneath Broadway was a great place to play and to see music and theatre and this reminds me of those days. GFO was: Tony Atherton (alto sax), Diane Barkauskas (keyboard, accordion), Dave Black (amplified string bass), Joe Bouchard (Guitar), Jeff Fairbanks (drums, marimba), Martin Tardif (electric bass), and Jerry Wheeler (trombone). Tune by Jeff Fairbanks”

Bookmarks for December 19th to 27th [del.icio.us]

Bookmarks for December 19th to 27th [del.icio.us]

Bookmarks from December 19th to December 27th

  • Los Angeles Eat+Drink – Drowning, Not Eating – page 1 – “Tortas cubanas are almost as common as burritos in Los Angeles. Mexico City–style pambazos rule the world of street food. The muscular cemita Poblano commands a fleet of trucks extending as far as the Westside. But the king of Mexican sandwiches is the mighty torta ahogada — drowned sandwich — a mass of bread and sauce and meat that is less a foodstuff than a way of life. You do not nibble at a torta ahogada; you dive straight into it, trusting that you will come out alive. I had always thought that roasted goat was the emblematic dish of Guadalajara, but tortas ahogadas joints there outnumber birria parlors at least 20:1…”
  • Four New Images by Street Artist Banksy… “Four new images by the elusive street artist Banksy have surfaced over the weekend, with one seemingly attacking global warming sceptics. Banksy graffiti. Photo: Londonist.com The pieces follow the Copenhagen summit. Photo: londonist.com The latest designs were discovered by londonist.com along the banks of Regent’s Canal. It found the first beneath Camden Street Bridge – “almost in the back yard of the British Transport Police building”. The second and third pieces were etched under and next to the Oval Road Bridge in the direction of Primrose Hill. The most provocative simply has the words: “I don’t believe in global warming”, with the writing gradually disappearing into a canal.”
  • “Alt-Classical”: Is This the Future? “Hot on the heels of James MacMillan’s red-hot piece in these pages calling Emperor’s New Clothes on Pierre Boulez, plus Dilettante Music’s digital composer-in-residence contest, and Norman Lebrecht’s poll of the living composers creating the most durable work (John Adams is no.1, then Part, then Reich), here’s more contemporary food for thought. Greg Sandow of Artsjournal’s blog about the future of classical music has run a post about the Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s two new composers-in-residence. They are Mason Bates and Anna Clyne. Not likely to be familiar names if your view of new music is simply what the BBC Symphony Orchestra…”
  • Richard Lainhart: Puremagnetik interview dec 2009“The Ondes Martenot is a very expressive electronic instrument – Maurice Martenot, who invented it, was a cellist, and wanted an electronic instrument that could be played with the same degree of expression as a string instrument. Oraison is a piece I’ve always loved – I first heard it years ago as a student – and when I got the Buchla/Continuum system, I realized that the Continuum would let me play the piece myself, as it’s a superbly expressive controller, with the advantage that it’s polyphonic, unlike the original Ondes. So I spent some time transcribing the piece from the original score, then spent a lot more time practicing it. The Buchla let me program a sound that was similar to the Ondes, but with even more expression in the timbre control, and that’s what I used for my version. So, my own realization is a kind of analog-digital homage to the original – analog in the sound-producing domain, but digital in the control domain.”
  • The Pushbutton Web: Realtime Becomes Real – Anil Dash “Pushbutton is a name for what I believe will be an upgrade for the web, where any site or application can deliver realtime messages to a web-scale audience, using free and open technologies at low cost and without relying on any single company like Twitter or Facebook. The pieces of this platform have just come together to enable a whole set of new features and applications that would have been nearly impossible for an average web developer to build in the past”
  • Orson Welles and His Brief Passionate Betacam Love Affair – Orson Welles – Gizmodo“In January 1985, the phone rang. The caller announced that he was Orson Welles and that he wanted to have lunch with me. Thus began one of the most extraordinary and bittersweet adventures of my life.” Sometimes the journeys we take through this life begin and end in the most unexpected ways. My encounter with Welles in the last days of his life centered on a common interest: Sony’s new one-piece camcorder, the Betacam. It had just come to market and Welles, always the genius filmmaker, had big ideas for what he could do with one. With Welles there were no limits. “You can’t do that” wasn’t in his vocabulary. This was a short, but very passionate story


Bookmarks for November 10th through November 16th [del.icio.us]

Bookmarks for November 10th through November 16th [del.icio.us]

Bookmarks from November 10th through November 16th:[del.icio.us]

  • I dreamed the press would be forgiving – Life’s a Pitch -”Due to the high price point of this box set we will only be able to send out review copies on loan on a case by case basis and will not be able to provide any contest copies. However, we can do contests using single disc bundles from the box set. Please let me know if you would like to run a contest. I have also included a widget below which includes a video describing the box set. … PS. Because there are no review copies we are allowing members of the media to purchase Outside The Box at the wholesale cost $475. Let me know if you are interested. Bold. Call. I understand the loan thing, but the “wholesale” cost? Is that almost insulting, or is it just me? I can’t imagine someone from the classical music press in 2009 paying $475 for a review copy, unless he or she was going to turn around and sell it on eBay for a profit. Which would probably make them more than their paper would pay for the review itself! “
  • Greg Mitchell: The Great Atomic Film Cover-Up -
    “In the weeks following the atomic attacks on Japan 64 years ago, and then for decades afterward, the United States engaged in airtight suppression of all film shot in Hiroshima and Nagasaki after the bombings. This included footage shot by U.S. military crews and Japanese newsreel teams. In addition, for many years, all but a handful of newspaper photographs were seized or prohibited. The public did not see any of the newsreel footage for 25 years, and the U.S. military film remained hidden for nearly four decades. I first probed the coverup back in 1983 in Nuclear Times magazine (where I was editor), and developed it further in later articles and in my 1995 book with Robert Jay Lifton, Hiroshima in America and in a 2005 documentary Original Child Bomb. To see some of the footage, go to my blog. “
  • Michael Kaiser: Does the Symphonic Orchestra Model Work? -
    “One of the Fellows participating in the Kennedy Center Arts Management Institute raised a serious question with me: can the traditional model of a symphony orchestra work in the United States? He observed that salaries are very high for musicians, conductors and guest artists, and ticket demand is not strong enough to cover most of these costs. High ticket prices are stifling that demand and contributions will continue to have to grow very rapidly to cover inflation. I cannot argue with this analysis. Somehow the cost structure for American orchestras has risen to the point that every orchestra is likely to struggle to make ends meet.”
  • The McSweeney’s Effect « Mark Athitakis’ American Fiction Notes -
    “[I]t does this incredible thing for people like me, or people like me five years ago if that makes sense. Because a lot of publishers, for reasons of legitimacy, feel the need to include big writers. Or maybe it’s not even for legitimacy, maybe it’s just to put names on the front cover that will sell. And usually, to be honest, it’s the crummier work from those writers. They rarely, if ever, take risks on folk who they’ve never heard of. You might not have heard of them as the reader, but it’s almost always someone on the magazine who knew someone, someone’s old professor makes a call and gets the story in.”
  • Art review: ‘Collection: MOCA’s First Thirty Years’ | Culture Monster | Los Angeles Times -
    “But this is not just a promotional treasure-house show. Installed chronologically by chief curator Paul Schimmel, it also tells a story — although one that’s rarely heard. The postwar rise of American art is paired with the simultaneous rise of Los Angeles, from shallow backwater to cultural powerhouse. At the Grand Avenue building, which spans 1939 to 1979, the distinctive emergence of a mature L.A. art is embedded within the larger postwar prominence of the United States, artistically dominated by New York. At the Geffen — the story picks up in the year MOCA was born. Two telling works flank the Grand Avenue entry. At the left, a lovely little 1939 abstraction by Piet Mondrian signals Modernism’s shift from Europe to America as war loomed. At the right is Sam Francis’ luminous cloud of gray-white color, painted in postwar Paris in 1951 as an atmospheric evocation of urban light. Francis later moved to Santa Monica and served as a founding MOCA trustee.”
  • The Hundred Greatest Quotes From “The Wire” In Ten Minutes (VIDEO)
    “The Wire” was arguably the best show to ever grace our televisions and now an entrepreneurial fan has strung together all the best lines from its five seasons into one ten-minute video. Omar, Bubbles, Bunk, McNulty, Rawls, Stringer, Avon, Snoop, Marlo, Cheese, Prop Joe, Clay Davis and more are immortalized for their funniest and most poignant lines. “
  • The Source » Twitter users weigh in on the Gold Line Eastside Extension
    “Six years ago when the Gold Line to Pasadena opened there was no Twitter. Today on the first day of revenue service for the new Gold Line Eastside extension, L.A.’s first light rail since then, Twitter is a global phenomenon. Angelenos are taking advantage of the technology to share their feelings about the extension in 140 character blips. I counted over 300 tweets referencing the Gold Line during yesterdays grand opening and the tweets continue today as revenue service gets underway. Early Sunday morning, Twitter users were sharing their anticipation for the day:…”
  • John Cage Visualization on Vimeo -
    “Kinetic typography sketch using an excerpt from Indeterminacy 136 and a section from Tossed as it is Untroubled, both by John Cage. The typefaces are Serifa and Bookman Old Style. The animation is done in AfterEffects.”
  • Disquiet » Keith Fullerton Whitman Live at Root Strata’s On Land Festival (AIFF)

    “Back in September, the first On Land festival brought a wide range of quiet-minded electronicists and other music-makers to San Francisco. I caught the first of the three concerts, which were conceived by the Root Strata record label, but unfortunately for me not the one featuring a solo performance by Boston-based musician Keith Fullerton Whitman. Of course, missed concert opportunities aren’t what they once were. Chances are, someone recorded what you didn’t witness — sometimes even the musicians themselves. And fortunately in this case, Whitman has just uploaded a high-quality recording of the nearly 20-minute set to his soundcloud.com/kfw space:”

Bookmarks for October 24th through October 31st [del.icio.us]

Bookmarks for October 24th through October 31st [del.icio.us]

Bookmarks from October 24th through October 31st:[del.icio.us]

  • Brow Beat : The DORF Matrix: Towards a Theory of NPR’s Taste in Black Music -
    “In the weeks since the publication of the All Songs Considered list, I have been puzzling over NPR’s musical coverage—in particular, its approach to black music. I wondered: Could NPR’s musical taste be as lily-white as the “The Best Music of 2009 (So Far)” list? After scouring NPR’s Web site and studying its broadcasts—All Things Considered profiles, Fresh Air interviews, even the music interludes played between segments on NPR’s marquee programs—I can report that the answer is no. It’s not that NPR doesn’t like black music. It merely maintains a strict preference for black music that few actual living African-Americans listen to.”
  • why i’m not afraid to take your money« by amanda fucking palmer -
    “I know this for myself – it’s something you’ve done since you were six years old, and there’s a sense that if you stop giving 100% you are doomed to failure, and that is unacceptable. No wonder so many players hate their sport – the surprise is that so few admit it.” And despite all the kudos, money and silverware, there’s a reason it’s the top players who suffer most – because they’re the ones playing the most tennis, as they don’t get knocked out in the first or second round. So they have the least free time, the most mental stress and suffer the most physically. Agassi’s avowed hatred for his sport is far from exclusive to tennis. British cyclists Chris Boardman, the former Olympic pursuit champion, and Tour de France star David Millar have both admitted to not really liking cycling. “In Boardman’s case,” says William Fotheringham, the Guardian’s cycling correspondent, “he liked the winning not the cycling itself, and he drove himself to win.”
  • Why did Andre Agassi hate tennis? | Sport | The Guardian -
    “I know this for myself – it’s something you’ve done since you were six years old, and there’s a sense that if you stop giving 100% you are doomed to failure, and that is unacceptable. No wonder so many players hate their sport – the surprise is that so few admit it.” And despite all the kudos, money and silverware, there’s a reason it’s the top players who suffer most – because they’re the ones playing the most tennis, as they don’t get knocked out in the first or second round. So they have the least free time, the most mental stress and suffer the most physically. Agassi’s avowed hatred for his sport is far from exclusive to tennis. British cyclists Chris Boardman, the former Olympic pursuit champion, and Tour de France star David Millar have both admitted to not really liking cycling. “In Boardman’s case,” says William Fotheringham, the Guardian’s cycling correspondent, “he liked the winning not the cycling itself, and he drove himself to win.”
  • don’t care about old composers-rogerbourland.com -
    “I asked Aaron Copland what he was composing in fall 1976: “Nothing, and I am not accepting commissions; if people want to play my music, there’s plenty of it available in my catalog.” Today I went through an old journal, listing old UCLA Music faculty and their appointments and salaries. I looked at all the composers and saw their careers over a span of decades. I sighed and thought about how none of their music is heard these days. And I’m sure that this is true for every music school in America.”
  • Brand (Dis)Loyalty « The Quick and the Ed -
    “A couple of days ago a message popped up on my Tivo informing me of a new service, “Blockbuster on Demand.” Ah, Blockbuster. That takes me back, to that period of about four years when all of the mom and pop video rental stores had been driven out of business but Netflix hadn’t yet arrived, so the only way to rent a movie was to drive to the nearest Blockbuster, spend ten minutes trying to find a place to park, discover that your first eight choices were unavailable, wait in line for fifteen minutes, and be informed by a surly, inattentive clerk that you owed the Blockbuster corporation 27 dollars in late fees and other assorted charges. snip This is what happens when organizations use their monopoly status to mistreat customers. Sooner or later the world changes, your monopoly is gone, and you pay the price… If there’s one thing that’s pretty certain, it’s that people will have more education choices in the future than they’ve had in the pas
  • Music review: ‘Einstein’ at the beach | Culture Monster | Los Angeles Times -
    So “Baby Einstein” won’t make your kids smarter after all. Last week, the Walt Disney Co. confessed that plopping kids in front of its video does not count as instant education and offered to refund gullible parents their money. But the few enlightened parents who tried “Einstein on the Beach” instead may have a wiser tale to tell. Saturday night, Jacaranda, the West Side’s new music series, concluded its first concert of the season at First Presbyterian Church of Santa Monica with excerpts from Philip Glass’ groundbreaking opera he conceived with director Robert Wilson in 1976. Glass offers the option of replacing the women’s voices at the end with a children’s chorus and that is what Jacaranda did. Asking youngsters to show up late at night to sing the last eight minutes of a five-hour avant-garde work is, obviously, unreasonable. Then again, little about putting on “Einstein on the Beach” has ever been practical…”


Bookmarks for October 12th through October 15th [del.icio.us]

Bookmarks for October 12th through October 15th [del.icio.us]

Bookmarks from October 12th through October 15th:[del.icio.us]

  • Views: Professors Should Embrace Wikipedia – Inside Higher Ed -
    “I propose that all academics with research specialties, no matter how arcane (and nothing is too obscure for Wikipedia), enroll as identifiable editors of Wikipedia. We then watch over a few wikipages of our choosing, adding to them when appropriate, stepping in to resolve disputes when we know something useful. We can add new articles on topics which should be covered, and argue that others should be removed or combined. This is not to displace anonymous editors, many of whom possess vast amounts of valuable information and innovative ideas, but to add our authority and hard-won knowledge to this growing universal library”
  • Terminal Degree: Is he kidding? -
    “My previous employer just blogged about the need for a “health care solution that will enable a healthier place for all of God’s children.” Longtime readers of this blog will get the irony: While I was an adjunct there, I couldn’t get health care through my employer. Maybe that sentence should read “all God’s full-time, tenure-track children.”
  • Betty Draper Affair Advice: Not That You Asked | Unsolicited Advice -
    “Betty. Betty, Betty, Betty. I’m not going to recap your various travails here. I’ll leave that to the experts. But I can give you a few concrete pieces of advice (or plot developments, or whatever) that might exponentially increase your happiness. Ready?”
  • The music of Los Angeles on CitySounds.fm -
    “DavidDavid Weekend fun: Citysounds 2.0 “Exactly one month ago, we introduced you to Citysounds.fm, a really cool mashup created by Henrik Berggren and David Kjelkerud during the London Music Hack Day. Citysounds is built on top of the SoundCloud API and makes it easy to browse through SoundCloud tracks from a specific city around the world. Today, Henrik and David inform us about a big update they just launched and let me tell you that it’s pretty exciting. They’ve added a great set of features and we think that the current look & feel is a big improvement. So what’s new? Show more tracks from one city: when selecting a city on the frontpage, you’ll be able to click through to the city overview page where it will show you more tracks from that city:”
  • SoundGrid @ mifki -
    “SoundGrid aims to be the most advanced matrix sequencer for iPhone / iPod Touch to create stunning audio-visual performances in a moment and wherever you are. It was inspired by famous Yamaha Tenori-On and popular ToneMatrix webapp by André Michelle. Even if you never composed music you will find SoundGrid simple and exciting to play with and will start creating brilliant compositions in minutes with just the tips of your fingers. Then easily share them with other users and in turn browse, download and rate their creations. Or you can record composition to audio file, upload it directly to SoundCloud or export via email. You can even create your own unique ringtones!”
  • 10/GUI on Vimeo -
    Here it is: my crazy summer project to reinvent desktop human-computer interaction. This video examines the benefits and limitations inherent in current mouse-based and window-oriented interfaces, the problems facing other potential solutions, and visualizes my proposal for a completely new way of interacting with desktop computers.
  • TuneGlue° | Relationship Explorer -
    very interesting music mapping site based on band in last.fm
  • Essay – The Collider, the Particle and a Theory About Fate – NYTimes.com -
    “Then it will be time to test one of the most bizarre and revolutionary theories in science. I’m not talking about extra dimensions of space-time, dark matter or even black holes that eat the Earth. No, I’m talking about the notion that the troubled collider is being sabotaged by its own future. A pair of otherwise distinguished physicists have suggested that the hypothesized Higgs boson, which physicists hope to produce with the collider, might be so abhorrent to nature that its creation would ripple backward through time and stop the collider before it could make one, like a time traveler who goes back in time to kill his grandfather”
  • Lefsetz Letter » Blog Archive » The Spotify Guys
    “Spotify employs P2P software, that’s why it’s so damn good. It takes 2-5 seconds to ramp up each and every song, which has reduced bit rate during that window, but usually that’s a relatively dead window and the listener isn’t paying close attention anyway. Yes, there are tricks. Only seventy five percent of the song is downloaded, an algorithm provides the remaining twenty five percent. This is how they all do it, it’s de rigueur. And the files don’t only come from Spotify’s servers, bits and pieces come from other users with the software installed on their computers. Net effect? It feels like you own the track. Usability is equal to iTunes. You can fast forward, rewind, there’s no lag time. Well, that’s a bit different. You see then Spotify depends on the network. Which is why they’ve limited sign-ups in the nations they’ve already launched in. They want the streaming experience to be perfect on your mobile device, after all, you’re depending on it…”
  • Acclaimed composer Terry Riley celebrated at Bard — Page 2 — Times Union – Albany NY:3351: -
    “Most composers notate a piece to perfection — hoping for a masterpiece, perhaps — and then move on. But Riley is a dabbler. “I’ll present a piece before it’s finished, then it will be different at the next performance,” he says. “Then after 10 years it will take a new shape that I’m happy with and maybe change again after 20 years. It’s because I improvise so much.” …his roots in jazz and Indian ragas should both come through on Saturday. To him, the term improvisation seldom means starting from nothing and just seeing what happen “They’re improvisations but built on existing structures, maybe not chord progressions (as with jazz), but modes and rhythmic cycles and looplike patterns,” Riley explains. “We’ll have a little rehearsal the day before (at Bard), but also a bit of flying by the seat of the pants. I like that and I think these players do, too.”
  • THE RESULTS ARE IN (Brown List 2009) -
    “Welcome to the official site of the 2009 BROWN LIST, brought to you by the Hollywood Temp Diaries. As you’ve gleaned from my postings and your own experiences, there are a lot of people in Hollywood who are a real pain in the ass. Oddly enough, there are some decent people in this town too (they probably won’t make it too far, but that’s their problem). Anyhoo, I’ve compiled a list of people’s MOST-LIKED and LEAST-LIKED entertainment industry executives in something I’m calling the BROWN LIST. Click on the .pdf below and enjoy the read. Thanks to everyone for participating.”
  • Cloud Eye Control joins the traditional and futuristic — latimes.com -
    “On the fifth floor of the Los Angeles Theater Center in downtown L.A., the members of Cloud Eye Control are trying to create poetry out of collaborative technology. On one end of the large studio, makeshift tables hold laptops and electronic equipment, with a cluster of musical instruments nearby. The middle of the room is dominated by two free-standing screens… It’s only days away from the debut of the full-length version of “Under Polaris” at REDCAT, and there still are snags to work out, transitions to be smoothed. This performance combines live action, recorded animation, multiple projectors, mobile props, and a five-piece live band, so there’s still much to do. And, in the spirit of what Chi-wang Yang, the director of the group, calls do-it-yourself aesthetics, they somehow pull it all together.”

Bookmarks for September 28th through October 1st [del.icio.us]

Bookmarks for September 28th through October 1st [del.icio.us]

/a>Bookmarks from September 28th through October 1st:[del.icio.us]

  • Taruskin, vol.5, page 220 « The Rambler
    “I’ve just recently, and belatedly, started leafing through Richard Taruskin’s monumental History of Western Music, one of the musicological banner publications of 2005. Now, I’ve been an occasional fan of Taruskin’s work – his Grove article on Nationalism is flawed, but significant, and Defining Russia Musically was an inspirational book for me… There’s far too much to go into here about what winds me up about this book (how about the laughable Europhobia, in which European music after 1950 is merely a Cold War sideshow, and after 1960 non-existent), much of which will have been said elsewhere, but I just wanted to get my reaction to one page in particular off my chest. This is page 220 of volume 5, on which Taruskin is discussing (speculating on) the Cold War implications of Penderecki’s Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima. I fear, as an example of the lazy thought and downright falsehoods of this book, it may not be unique.”
  • Music Apps Blur the Gap Between You and Clapton – NYTimes.com -
    “And this is where it gets back to being like a video game. Many musical apps offer the ability to record a track, then add layers on top of it. Doing this between disparate apps is impossible without external recording software, but a multi-instrumental app like Moocow’s Band gives novices the opportunity to record and edit tracks with drums, bass and guitar, and make sure it all sounds pretty good (even if one doesn’t know how to play a lick of music). It’s as much a game as Guitar Hero, only instead of trying to keep up with prerecorded music, the goal is to make music of one’s own.”

Bookmarks for September 6th through September 20th [del.icio.us]

Bookmarks for September 6th through September 20th [del.icio.us]

Bookmarks from September 6th through September 20th:[del.icio.us]

  • 5 Ways to Build a Fascist-Proof America | Rights and Liberties | AlterNet – “America’s best (and perhaps only) chance to keep the shreds of its tattered democracy intact is to get serious about cutting working Americans back into the democratic contract — and repair their broken trust by making damn sure those promises are actually kept. Once they’re back on board, the system will begin to work again for everyone. Until then, the accelerating breakdown is just going to continue. It’s not going to be easy. Right-wing populism is riding so high among the middle and working classes right now that there’s nothing progressives can say right now that they’re likely to believe. So we need to let our actions do the talking — and there are five solid places we can start that will get their attention.”
  • Nick Hornby on the liberating effect of MP3 blogs | Music | The Observer – “In the year that High Fidelity was published, a new CD shop opened in my neighbourhood and rejuvenated my listening habits. The shop did well, initially, and I spent a lot of time in there, buying pretty much whatever the owners told me to buy; they were very clever, it seemed to me, in targeting the ageing (or perhaps, more precisely, ex-) hipsters of north London, people who were growing sick of their REM albums but didn’t know what else to buy. They sold hundreds of copies of Buena Vista Social Club, and a lot of tasteful trip-hop – which, as Simon Reynolds pointed out, was “merely a form of gentrification”. But then, what are you supposed to do if you’re becoming gentrified? Pretend it isn’t happening?”
  • Criticism « Proper Discord – “That the longest piece in the concert was played badly, and should have been cut. Mediocre performances aren’t just a boring waste of time. If nobody acknowledges that they are bad, it creates the illusion that there’s something the audience doesn’t get. They feel alienated, and they don’t come back. I’m not saying that we shouldn’t stage concerts if there’s a risk of doing them badly – there’s an element of creative risk in any good concert – but I am saying that we do ourselves a disservice when we create an environment that is hostile to the idea that there is room for improvement. There are plenty of ways you can dismiss my artistic criticism. Here are a few that I’ve seen:”
  • Artists Paid – REASONS I PREFER A LESS KNOWN BAND -”1. There’s a good chance you’ll talk to me 2. Even better, that you’ll know my name and not be a passerby 3. You appreciate/recognize individual supporters and interact with us closer 4. WE CAN ACTUALLY BUY TICKETS TO YOUR SHOWS 5. Sometimes you’ll come and play at ours because you can 6. Sometimes you’ll Tweet and say “I’m going to be playing here” and play there… FOR FREE 7. Sometimes you’ll spend four and a half hours playing all your songs back to back to say thank you 8. Sometimes you’ll send us emails or letters to individuals just to say ‘Hey, I like what you’ve been doing, thanks’ 9. I get to be in your album notes and contribute in various shapes and forms 10. The music quality isn’t actually WORSE than the big bands, and in some cases, exceeds it”

  • Bookmarks for August 23rd through August 29th [del.icio.us]

    Bookmarks for August 23rd through August 29th [del.icio.us]

    Bookmarks from August 23rd through August 29th:[del.icio.us]

    • How To: Find Out How Much Your Insurer Sucks -”When you’re shopping for an insurance company, check the insurer’s complaint record — especially if it’s a small insurer that’s offering a good rate, but you haven’t heard much about its reputation. Saving a few dollars per year in premiums can backfire if the insurer hassles you at claim time.” To access this information, go to the National Association of Insurance Commissioners’ Consumer Information Source. Type in the name of the company, the state where you live and the type of insurance. (Under “statement type” and “business type,” click on “property/casualty” for home and auto insurance or “life, accident and health.”) The site then provides the insurer’s national complaint statistics.
    • The Industrial Jazz Group » Put Another Nickel In -”Donate $50,000, and get a copy of the new CD, the high five, the shout-out, the photo, the bit part, the personal liner note “thank you,” plus my Volvo Station Wagon, a historic vehicle which was used in seven IJG tours on the west coast (and which still displays some of the wear and tear from same).”
    • Stew is still stewing over L.A.’s snub of ‘Passing Strange’ — latimes.com -”When were we going through the classic L.A. club grind,” he begins, speaking of his days this decade with the Negro Problem, “at a certain point, we were selling out Spaceland like you’re supposed to do. But when we didn’t get handed the brass ring of the major label deal and we didn’t get handed the brass ring of the hip, indie label deal, it was like a lot of the powers that be were sort of looking at us like . . . ‘what good are you guys?’ “
    • School board approves plan to open up schools to outsiders — latimes.com -”The Los Angeles Board of Education voted today to open up 250 schools, including 50 new multimillion-dollar campuses, to outside charter operators and others. The move came after a nearly four-hour debate on a 6-1 vote, with board member Marguerite Poindexter LaMotte opposing. Under the proposal by board member Yolie Flores Aguilar, nonprofit charter groups and the mayor’s group that oversees 11 schools could compete for the chance to run these schools. Ultimately, it will be up to Supt. Ramon C. Cortines to select the winning bid for these campuses. Labor unions were especially opposed to the plan, with teachers union head A.J. Duffy saying the district needs to be collaborative if it wants to reform schools.”
    • Dream of a Common Language. Sueño de un Idioma Común.: Texas Monthly September 2009 -”In traditional bilingual classes, learning English is the top priority. The ultimate aim is to move kids out of non-English-speaking classrooms as quickly as possible. Students in dual language classes, on the other hand, are encouraged to keep their first language as they learn a second. And Ysleta’s program, called two-way dual language, is even more radical, because kids who speak only English are also encouraged to enroll. Everyone sits in the same classroom. Spanish-speaking kids are expected to help the English speakers in the early grades, which are taught mostly in Spanish. As more and more English is introduced into the classes, the roles are reversed. Even the teachers admit it can look like chaos to an outsider. “Dual language classes are very loud,” said Steven Vizcaino, who was an early student in the program and who graduated from Del Valle High in June. “Everyone is talking to everyone.”
    • Part 1: iTunes and the pen | theCLog -”What about all those other authors out there, banging away on their keyboards, giving life to characters, and telling stories that resonate in the lives of their readers? Do they need music to work? Is it simply a background, or does it find a way into their words? It wasn’t really a surprise to find a lot of the writers I spoke with had similar, lyric-less requirements when it comes to their own writing habits.”
    • Alexey Steele, Classical Underground impresario — latimes.com – scott timburg on alexey steele’s los angeles classical underground series “Certainly, at the Classical Underground concerts, art and music seem vital indeed. Not only for the audience, but for the players. The August concert included an austere, resonant Bach Cello Suite, a Prokofiev piano sonata rendered with sterling clarity by a pianist raising money for her CD release, and several melodic pieces by lesser-known composers. Afterward, many of the musicians came back and played; the cellist improvised on Bach. (Some nights, these after parties go until dawn.) “I don’t play it! I don’t know notes!” Steele exclaims. “I didn’t get one music lesson in my life! And I need it. I’m proof that people need it. I’m living proof that classical music lives!”