Posts Tagged ‘recession’

In Remembrance of the Great Recession

In Remembrance of the Great Recession

while i was sitting in traffic yesterday i started to think how about how much this financial disaster has changed the lives of my friends and family over the last two years. it’s one thing to get caught of the larger debate (and the spectacle of it all), but maybe the best way we can decide whether we are going in the right direction is a personal assessment of our own community. so on this memorial day weekend i’m taking a personal inventory of my community (colleagues, friends, family and neighbors) to remember how bad things have become during our “Great Recession

In Remembrance of the Great Recession of 2008-2010

  • of my family member who has lost his catering business
  • of my family member whose job has been moved to the east coast and but whose termination keeps getting delayed 6 months at a time
  • of my family member who lost his job in retail and now works as a temporary manual contract (scab) labor to pay the bills
  • of those of us whose property value is under water
  • of my neighbor who is over 50 and lost his private sector job a year ago and hasn’t been able to find any work
  • of my neighbor who was planning to retire and whose pension has lost so much value he has to work at least 5 more years
  • of my new neighbors who lost their house and are now renting next door
  • of the neighbors who have have lost their homes (and are sitting empty) along my daily walk through the neighborhood (1 out of every 6 the last i counted)
  • of my friend who lost his job and is now working whatever part time work he can to put food on the table
  • of many of my part time colleagues at CSUF who have lost work or have had their hours dramatically cut
  • of my secondary school colleagues who have been pink slipped and/or displaced for this fall
  • of those of us at CSUF and secondary schools who still have jobs in education but have taken a 10% pay cut and at least 3 weeks of furlough
  • of those friends of friends who have cashed in their retirement plans to make ends meet
  • of those who have moved into a smaller house and/or moving in with parents for housing
  • i also have realized that we also have to take some personal responsibility here and maybe we created much of these problems because our inability to live within our means and are now collectively paying the piper.

    from what i see many of us are helping each other out, but where has our government been? this is biggest crisis to happen in my life and it seems that we are expected to get through this storm on our own.

    where are the WPA type jobs programs? where did the stimulus money go? has the promise of an education for all disappeared for good? (at least in california)

    my fear is that a few years from now we are going to look back and realize that the middle class dream of being able to work a decent job for decent pay died in the summer of 2010 and was traded for that old libertarian mantra “it’s every man for himself”


    "A Tribute to the Slowness of Anxiety"

    "A Tribute to the Slowness of Anxiety"

    My Music for Controllers EP has recieved another thoughtful review via The Muse is Music

    “A tribute to the slowness of anxiety, by Instructor of Music at California State University, Fullerton Paul Bailey. His introduction speaks of his distress over the current economic downturn, but the music itself is absolutely timeless.

    A quiet, transcendent work, which the composer nearly forgot after concluding it was “a little too minimal.”

    (Note to self, spend some time on this site.)

    thanks fred!

    got a great review of my Music for Controllers EP from marc weidenbaum at disquiet.com

    “Probably the sole development that wasn’t a surprise, pleasant or otherwise, was that other musicians would use the Buddha Machine as a tool of self-expression. Among the latest is Paul Bailey, whose recent Music for Controllers album includes several tracks featuring the Buddha Machine (in this case, the Buddha Machine app for the iPhone and iPod Touch). The opening tones on the album’s opening track are familiar, their patient looping like waves brushing up against the shore, albeit in slow motion (MP3). But that’s just the start. Then comes a pitter-patter like some children’s wind-up toy acting up, and a tentative bit of melody that slowly, ever so slowly, over the course of nine minutes, finds a common sensibility with the looping tones, and insinuates its own drone-like hymn. In the process, Bailey manages to do what many Buddha Machine adopters have not, which is to once again relegate the machine to the background.”

    are improvisations performed live using ableton live, korg/nanokey, buddha machine and srutibox (iphone), and korg kaossilator

    Music for Controllers by paul bailey

    Music for Controllers I
    created using ableton live, buddha machine (iphone), korg kaossillator and nano-key

    Music for Controllers II (coming soon)

    Music for Controllers III and Music for Controllers IV

    were improvised live using ableton live/ korg/nanokey, buddha machine (iphone), and the korg kaossilator

    Music for Controllers V
    improvisation post-whatever ableton, buddha machine (iphone), srutibox just-intonation drone

    Music for Controllers VI (A Stable Job is an Oxymoron)
    this track was based on a field recording i made of my last day of work before my “fall break” at CSUF (a one-week non paid work furlough). a few days later i improvised over the recording of my commute (from highland park to union station) with some materials of an earlier piece i made last spring (not getting fired is the new promotion). when it was finished i felt it was a little too minimal and forgot about it until about a week ago and when i listened to it again i realized it pretty accurately captured my dread of what this financial disaster has become in my life.
    interestingly enough on that was the same day on my commute home the conductor on my amtrak route told me that she had lost about 75 daily commuters between san diego and los angeles from a year ago and it was pretty sad how so few of us were left. i know for me there aren’t many part time faculty left in the music department at CSUF and at this point it’s can get pretty depressing whenever i think about all of my friends who are out of work.
    probably a little TMI, but yeah… i guess it is a bit dark.

    Music for Controllers VI (A Stable Job is an Oxymoron) is spoken word piece based on twitter RSS feeds on the keywords “fired” and “job”. parts of this piece were originally contained in the piece  “not getting fired is the new promotion” (2009) and was improvised/performed/composed using ableton live, novation launchpad, korg kaossilator, iphone (buddha machine, srutibox), text-2-speech, and a field recording (zoom H2) of my morning commute (metro goldline from heritage square to union station; los angeles, ca 10/15/2009 (10 min)
    are improvisations performed live using ableton live, korg/nanokey, buddha machine and srutibox (iphone), and korg kaossilator

    Music for Controllers I
    created using ableton live, buddha machine (iphone), korg kaossillator and nano-key

    Music for Controllers II (coming soon)

    Music for Controllers III and Music for Controllers IV

    were improvised live using ableton live/ korg/nanokey, buddha machine (iphone), and the korg kaossilator

    Music for Controllers V
    improvisation post-whatever ableton, buddha machine (iphone), srutibox just-intonation drone

    Music for Controllers VI (A Stable Job is an Oxymoron)
    this track was based on a field recording i made of my last day of work before my “fall break” at CSUF (a one-week non paid work furlough). a few days later i improvised over the recording of my commute (from highland park to union station) with some materials of an earlier piece i made last spring (not getting fired is the new promotion). when it was finished i felt it was a little too minimal and forgot about it until about a week ago and when i listened to it again i realized it pretty accurately captured my dread of what this financial disaster has become in my life.
    interestingly enough on that was the same day on my commute home the conductor on my amtrak route told me that she had lost about 75 daily commuters between san diego and los angeles from a year ago and it was pretty sad how so few of us were left. i know for me there aren’t many part time faculty left in the music department at CSUF and at this point it’s can get pretty depressing whenever i think about all of my friends who are out of work.
    probably a little TMI, but yeah… i guess it is a bit dark.

    Music for Controllers VI (A Stable Job is an Oxymoron) is spoken word piece based on twitter RSS feeds on the keywords “fired” and “job”. parts of this piece were originally contained in the piece  “not getting fired is the new promotion” (2009) and was improvised/performed/composed using ableton live, novation launchpad, korg kaossilator, iphone (buddha machine, srutibox), text-2-speech, and a field recording (zoom H2) of my morning commute (metro goldline from heritage square to union station; los angeles, ca 10/15/2009 (10 min)
    Music for Controllers by paul bailey


    Bookmarks for Jan-Feb 2010 [Google Reader}

    Bookmarks for Jan-Feb 2010  [Google Reader}

    Bookmarks from Jan-Feb 2010 [Google Reader]
    (just catching up, after moving my bookmarks from delicious to google reader)

    • Life, liberty and the pursuit of sanity – every thing you read in the mainstream media is true” “they call you sheeple” lol
    • DJ TechTools – “Little did G.C. Coleman know that his 5-second drum solo was going to spawn and influence multiple genres of music over the following forty years. In this first edition of DJ History, we are going to roll back the clock, open up DJ class and explore the mysteries of the Amen break, which has became a pivotal part of the dance music landscape. G.C. Coleman was the drummer for funk and soul outfit The Winstons’. In 1969 they released the single “Color Him Father,” which won the band a Grammy and broad critical acclaim. However, It was the B-side to the hit named “Amen, Brother” that would lead to the future evolution of dance music for decades to come. “Amen, Brother” was a quickly recorded B-side for The Winstons’ debut single.”
    • McSweeney’s Internet Tendency: Could It Be That the Best Chance to Save a Young Family From Foreclosure is a 28-Year-Old Pakistani American Playright-slash-Attorney who Learned Bankruptcy Law on the Internet? – “Could It Be That the Best Chance to Save a Young Family From Foreclosure is a 28-Year-Old Pakistani American Playright-slash-Attorney who Learned Bankruptcy Law on the Internet? Wells Fargo, You Never Knew What Hit You.”
    • What is Google Wave? | Business Center | Macworld – “Google describes Wave as “what e-mail would look like if it were invented today,” in the world of instant messaging, wikis, and online forums. But while the initial idea may have been to reinvent e-mail, in practice Wave is more akin to Google Docs than it is to Gmail. For example, how many times have you tried to develop a document through e-mail, with all those criss-crossing message threads clogging your inbox? Wave seeks to do away with that, by providing a single, hosted copy of a conversation that everyone can edit and discuss.”
    • BLOG.REPORTERWARSTORIES.COM: 1973: The Yom Kippur War; On The Benghazi Express; Meeting Idi Amin; Getting Strafed; Lunch with the Highjackers -”one of my favorite blogs. a lot of great behind the scenes shop top of “the story behind the story”
    • Expiration dates mean very little. – By Nadia Arumugam – Slate Magazine -”There’s a filet mignon in my fridge that expired four days ago, but it seems OK to me. I take a hesitant whiff and detect no putrid odor of rotting flesh, no oozing, fetid cow juice—just the full-bodied aroma of well-aged meat. A feast for one; I retrieve”
    • A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace – “Governments of the Industrial World, you weary giants of flesh and steel, I come from Cyberspace, the new home of Mind. On behalf of the future, I ask you of the past to leave us alone. You are not welcome among us. You have no sovereignty where we gather.”
    • National Geographic Magazine – NGM.com – “Yet Dharavi remains unique among slums. A neighborhood smack in the heart of Mumbai, it retains the emotional and historical pull of a subcontinental Harlem—a square-mile (three square kilometers) center of all things, geographically, psychologically, spiritually. Its location has also made it hot real estate in Mumbai, a city that epitomizes India’s hopes of becoming an economic rival to China. Indeed, on a planet where half of humanity will soon live in cities, the forces at work in Dharavi serve as a window not only on the future of India’s burgeoning cities, but on urban space everywhere.”
    • LA Eastside » The Mariachi-Oke Experiment con Trio Ellas – “Mariachi Plaza has been home to many troubadours, seeking to serenade the ears of passersby with their songs for sale. Across the way, this tradition has held true in the local neighborhood bar, Eastside Luv, a familiar and favorite spot of mine and many, away from the “Los Angeles” of late but with an added interactive twist to los Canciones de su Padre. For several months now, the barra monument to many things Mexican and Mexican American culture has been hosting “Mariachi-Oke!”  Yes, it is what it sounds like, and it is the first and third Sunday of every month. Patrons step on to the stage and attempt to belt out the ballads of Beltran, Negrete, Gabriel, and Fernandez without fear and hopefully, without forgetting the lyrics.  There are no bouncing balls highlighting the sing along words; it’s a sink or swim policy that ESL holds, which has filtered out the amateurs, but not always the hard of hearing.”
    • The Find: Magic Wok in Artesia – latimes.com – “Magic Wok is a porcine palace, a restaurant where the pillars of Filipino cooking are fortified by all things pork. Kids chomp on shards of pig skin as crisp as potato chips, grandparents leisurely ladle hunks of pork from sour tamarind soups — the homey restaurant went whole hog long before quivering cubes of pork belly cropped up on happy-hour menus and bacon became an almost de rigueur dessert.”
    • My Roger Ebert Story – Roger Ebert – Deadspin -Sir, Mr. Ebert, this is Will Leitch, an editor at the Daily Illini. I’ve had a bit to drikn and am going to just ask. There is an old story that you had sex on the EIC desk. Is that true? Everybody wants to knwo. Sorry for this.Best, Will”
    • The Find: The Slaw Dogs in Pasadena – latimes.com – “The Slaw Dogs is reimagining the humble hot dog with offerings such as a chicken Caesar salad dog, a Thai slaw dog and a Oaxacan dog.”
    • Los Angeles – “On a recent afternoon in the Eastside neighborhood of Lincoln Heights, Fay Green stands in the hallway of her apartment complex, which sits just feet above the bumper-to-bumper traffic of the I-5 freeway. A soft-spoken black woman, she lives with her five kids and one grandson in an urban planner’s idea of perfection: the dense, “Avenue 26″ master-planned community, touted by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and the city’s Department of Housing as an environmentally smart “transit-oriented development” in the city’s core, efficiently served by light rail.  From the outside, the stylish-looking village of 156 condos, called Puerta del Sol, and 378 other apartments squeezed between Avenue 26 and the thundering I-5 gives off a Crate & Barrel vibe. But Green’s four-bedroom unit, in the building dubbed Tesoro del Valle Family Apartments, is regularly dirtied by a heavy film of what she calls “dust.” She explains, “I clean the place up, and in two or three days, I have to wipe again.”
    • Peter Gabriel’s Scratch My Back is a most curious creation | Vancouver, Canada | Straight.com -”The new Peter Gabriel album—and what a rare phrase that has become!—is a most curious creation. An eclectic collection of covers from a fellow known for his original songwriting, it reimagines radio hits as modern-art music, full of shimmering orchestral effects and ethereal mood swings.”
    • The Mozart effect: Studies of music’s effect on children – latimes.com -”Even the author of the 1993 study that set off the commercial frenzy says her group’s findings — from an experiment that had college students, not babies, listen to Mozart — were “grossly misapplied and over-exaggerated.” Psychologist Frances Rauscher, along with the rest of the field studying music’s effects on the brain, has long since moved on to explore the effect of active musical instruction on cognitive performance.”
    • Well, This Employment Graph Is Just Terrifying – “This graph shows employment declines at the same chronological point during America’s last six recessions. Guess which one represents the current recession. Go ahead, guess. [New York Times(Thanks, Dan!)”
    • Los Angeles subway shots and Hollweird, CA – “i walk these all the time and have never seen them this way. great eye”
    • The New Commandments | Culture | Vanity Fair – “Thus we are fully entitled to consider them as a work in progress. May there not be some old commandments that could be retired, as well as some new ones that might be adopted? Taking the most celebrated Top 10 in order, we find (I am using the King James, or “Authorized,” version of the text):”
    • is there a trail? [Flickr] – “my flickr feed is randomly posting photo’s from this summer”

    Bookmarks for December 5th through December 10th [del.icio.us]

    Bookmarks for December 5th through December 10th [del.icio.us]

    Bookmarks from December 5th through December 10th:[del.icio.us]

    • Take a poll: Should I review Bocelli? – The Arts Blog : The Orange County Register -
      “A classical music critic is always a little out of place at an Andrea Bocelli concert. Generally, he’s the only one who doesn’t want to be there. A Bocelli concert, for all the tenor’s merits, for all his charisma, is about as classical as a Bugs Bunny cartoon. I’ve written reviews of Bocelli concerts before. As recently as last June. It’s kind of a no-win situation for a critic. If you’re totally honest, which I try to be, you always end up pissing someone off — i.e. usually the people who are bothering to read your review…”
    • jacktrip – Project Hosting on Google Code -
      “jackTrip is a Linux and Mac OS X-based system used for multi-machine network performance over the Internet. It supports any number of channels (as many as the computer/network can handle) of bidirectional, high quality, uncompressed audio signal steaming.” You can use it between any combination of Linux and Mac OS X (i.e., one end using Linux can connect to the other using Mac OS X). It is currently being developed and actively tested at CCRMA by the SoundWIRE group.
    • subway architecture -
      “london’s underground became the first subway system in the world when it began operation in 1863. since then, underground subways have been built in almost every major city of the world. from new york and paris to hong kong and dubai, subways are an essential part of public transportation in cities. within these systems, architecture plays a big role in defining the environment of the subway. here is a collection of some of the most architecturally interesting subway stations. “
    • RjDj -
      RjDj is a music and sound application for mobile devices with microphone and various other reality sensing sensors like accelerometer, touch pad, GPS etc. Currently the iPhone and iPod Touch are supported devices.
    • Cal State gets the wrong number in answering budget crisis — latimes.com
      “We seem to be quickly moving toward the day when the once-great Cal State system moves to a three-day week, with academic buildings rented out to storage companies and professors teaching class in parking lots and under trees. But even so, I was taken aback to hear they might be shutting down phone service at Cal State Long Beach. I drove to the campus to see if it was true. When I got to the office of Lisa Vollendorf, who runs the Romance, German and Russian department, I noticed that she still had a phone. “I still have mine, too,” said Jeff High, associate professor of German studies, who wasn’t sure how much longer he’d be able to make or take calls. Vollendorf, who is on the university budget committee, said turning off the phones campuswide was recommended by committee members as a way to avoid further cuts in instruction. The thinking was that professors could use personal cellphones to conduct school business.”

    Bookmarks for August 9th through August 17th [del.icio.us]

    Bookmarks from August 9th through August 17th:[del.icio.us]

    • TRIUMPH OF HIS WILL: GQ Feature on Quentin Tarantino – “You can lie about a lot of things,” he says, “but your filmography doesn’t lie. It’s right there. And it doesn’t give a shit about why you did it.”
    • Clare Graham’s Wonderama – LA Times Magazine -”As for the question of art versus craft, Graham comes down definitively on one side. “I don’t like the terms outsider art, or naive art. What I do is craft,” he insists. “Fine art has a need to communicate something. My work is about simple processes done to the nth degree until the accumulation is significant.”
    • Lefsetz Letter » Amanda Palmer email; the new art of twitter and blogging – “BUT this is, hands fucking down, also why people listen, why they search, why they want art. connection = primary. music/art = secondary.”
    • Ready for the devil we don’t know -LA Times endorses a constitutional convention to fix CA budget mess -”A single initiative to end the current rule requiring a two-thirds supermajority of the Legislature to adopt a budget may be doomed at the ballot box. But opponents are more likely to accept the change if they can keep the supermajority to increase taxes and are assured that future taxes will no longer be disguised as “fees.”
    • Fieldnotes from a Rock Band Bar Night | – “Much to my surprise, the scene reminded me of the participatory tradition that was the focus of my first major research project: Sacred Harp singing, an American vernacular hymnody tradition that is open to anyone, regardless of perceived musical expertise, and that revolves around drop-in community “singings” rather than rehearsed performances for an audience. “
    • Views on Music and Life from an outpost.: Making the case for the musical amateur. -”think to say that people simply need more exposure to jazz, to classical music, etc- is only half-right. I think that people need to be directly involved. Make people an active part of any activity, and they are much more likely to stay engaged.”
    • This Blog Will Change the World: No neon arrows – “What we need here is a third option, one which avoids asserting the absolute superiority of any one musical style without sliding into relativism.”
    • YouTube – GAMEBOY FOOT CONTROLLER DEMO + 8BIT GUITAR -
      joey mariano [animal-style] demonstrates his GBC Gameboy Foot Controller
    • How American Health Care Killed My Father – The Atlantic (September 2009) -”Indeed, I suspect that our collective search for villains—for someone to blame—has distracted us and our political leaders from addressing the fundamental causes of our nation’s health-care crisis.”
    • A music lesson for LACMA’s film program | Culture Monster | Los Angeles Times – “It is not without a twang of envy that I watch the film community react to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s announcement that the 40-year-old film program would go the way of the even older Monday Evening Concerts, which was thrown out on the cold street three years ago.”
    • Cal State Fullerton abruptly begins canceling classes – College Life OC – OCRegister.com -”Cal State Fullerton officials say the university has begun canceling classes, including those that were already underway, because its being required to make tens of millions of dollars in cuts to help the state balance its budget.”
    • WATTS ENSEMBLE: IF WE ALL GOT MOHAWKS -”What would I call the next punkest classical record? Fuck. I could tell you probably the Andy Kaufman of classical music, which is probably Terry Riley’s ‘In C.’ Don’t get me wrong—I love the piece but it almost feels like it’s daring you to like it. ‘In C’ is typically 45 minutes to an hour long and it’s everyone playing the phrases at the same tempo—but they play it staggered so it creates all these different patterns. It’s an amazing piece. But I’ve shown it to people before and they’re like, ‘Oh my God, this is driving me insane—I can’t deal with it.’ It’s kind of the same thing with Andy Kaufman. Some people were like, ‘Wow, this is fucking amazing’ and other people were like, ‘I can’t stand this guy.’”
    • The Fun Music Company Ultimate Flashcard Set -”In the Ultimate Instant Print Flashcard Set you get a comprehensive selection of printable flash cards that you print yourself, right from your computer.”
    • Create Digital Music » Hexagonal iPhone Sequencer-Rhythm Machine from Jordan Rudess -”Dream Theater keyboardist Jordan Rudess and noise.io developer Amidio have made a crazy-looking hexagonal sequencer for the iPhone. It comes with plenty of samples and factory sessions if you just want to play around…”
    • Terry Teachout Asks, Can Jazz Be Saved? – WSJ.com -”No, I don’t know how to get young people to start listening to jazz again. But I do know this: Any symphony orchestra that thinks it can appeal to under-30 listeners by suggesting that they should like Schubert and Stravinsky has already lost the battle. If you’re marketing Schubert and Stravinsky to those listeners, you have no choice but to start from scratch and make the case for the beauty of their music to otherwise intelligent people who simply don’t take it for granted. By the same token, jazz musicians who want to keep their own equally beautiful music alive and well have got to start thinking hard about how to pitch it to young listeners—not next month, not next week, but right now.”