Posts Tagged ‘video’

Post-Keyboard?

Post-Keyboard?

after the last few years of dipping my toes into the world of making electronic music i finally have had the time to give it my full attention.

the explosion and rampant experimentation of form factor in iphone and ipad music apps have made it possible to get hands-on with a wide range of digital “controllers”. my thesis and starting point for this journey begins with an observation and a question:

  • it’s interesting that in the electronic music revolution during the last 50 years, much of the music has been performed (at least melodically) based on a 17th C technology (the keyboard)
  • the question i pose and am attempting to solve is that if you don’t make electronic music with a keyboard, then how will you make it?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6-dAjULeWbI



Music for Commuters (RealNewMusic 2010)

Music for Commuters (RealNewMusic 2010)

here is the video from our (with jeremy keller, guitar) performance at the RealNewMusic 2010 show in whittier (091810)

overall i’m pretty happy with the whole shebang. the audio is a little light on the bass because the recording was made from the balcony. this piece originally was created as “music for controllers 1” which was became “music for commuters” when it became a duo and video was added.

below is the video from the show and the audio mp3′s from the show and dress rehearsal

music for commuters dress rehearsal, 091810
music for commuters live, 091810


links for 2010-04-05

links for 2010-04-05
  • “A year-old music blog. (Wow, time flies.) Dallas based, but needs a transfer to Montreal, stat. First to scoop “Creep” by Radiohead. OK, scratch that: like I said, they’ve only been doing this a year. But if Radiohead ever records a second track named “Creep,” they will definitely scoop that one.
    No affiliation with the prog-rock band Muse, especially after The Resistance. Contributors are co-workers Patrick and Fred, the lives of whom are otherwise so packed to the gills that you should have no doubt that The Muse encroaches on their work day. They only really agree on Deftones; Fred otherwise describes Patrick’s musical interests as “strum strum hippie yodel.” Just as Patrick describes Fred’s as “terrible.” Yet somehow the two reach a daily armistice; the written, ever-evolving text of which is known regionally as The Muse in Music.”
  • “These are signs seen primarily at Tea Party Protests.

    They all feature “creative” spelling or grammar.

    This new dialect of the English language shall be known as “Teabonics.”

  • “Though it looks kinda boring and unspectacular, this is easily the best example of the dish I’ve had to date. Never mind that the rice and beans were perfect, which in itself is an odd occurrence. The tortitas were the right balance of nopales, tortas, and chile sauce. Even though it was a quite mild sauce in terms of spiciness, it was rich with flavor, the kind you just want to spoon up and drink. Plus these tortas were soft and pliable, though they kept their form. Too many as of late have been quite hard and tough to eat. Not at Lencho’s.”
  • “Three weeks ago the hard drive in my MacBook Pro went bad. So far as I can tell, I didn’t lose a single byte of data. Here’s how:”
  • “A tribute to the slowness of anxiety, by Instructor of Music at California State University, Fullerton Paul Bailey. His introduction speaks of his distress over the current economic downturn, but the music itself is absolutely timeless.”
  • “See, Dr. Drew never met Corey Haim, the police haven’t determined what substance (if any) killed him, but Dr. Drew is pretty certain he knows what killed this total stranger—that’s how great of a doctor he is. He can diagnose and determine cause of death just by hearing someone’s name! He’s basically Miss Cleo but with a medical degree so people (wrongfully) take him seriously”
  • “So why don’t I charge? A large part of it is that composing is something I do because I want to, and because I really am passionate about it. Call it a “hobby” or whatever, but it’s what I enjoy doing, and once you start monetizing that, I think it becomes more of a job than something you do as an escape. Don’t get me wrong-I like my day job, I like being a physician, etc. But you can like your job and still get paid for it. For me (and I stress, this is just what works for me), charging for my music is not something I’m interested in. I’d feel like a prostitute. We don’t parent for money, right? I also don’t compose for money. QED.”
  • “Now let me give you a marketing tip. The people who can afford to buy books and magazines and go to the movies don’t like to hear about people who are poor or sick, so start your story up here [indicates top of the G-I axis]. You will see this story over and over again. People love it, and it is not copyrighted. The story is “Man in Hole,” but the story needn’t be about a man or a hole. It’s: somebody gets into trouble, gets out of it again [draws line A]. It is not accidental that the line ends up higher than where it began. This is encouraging to readers.”
  • “I was pretty confident that ‘In C’ was going to have a life, even in the beginning,” he says. “It was a pretty startlingly original idea in its time, and it just came to me. It developed out of a lot of interests that I had at the time. Being able to get this piece written on a piece of paper and still have such a vast potential, I think, is an unusual accomplishment. I saw that, but I didn’t realize how pervasive the influence of that piece would be over the years.”
  • very reasonable take on educational reform by the union rep of deb’s middle school
  • “Black settlers from what is now Sonora, Mexico, helped establish the first settlement in 1781. The labor of Tongva Indians helped raise the plaza’s church in the 1820s. The histories of L.A.’s Latino barrios and Chinatown also begin at the plaza, which was the site of one of the great crimes of Los Angeles history, the Chinese Massacre of 1871.

    In 1909 the City Council banned free speech in public areas except for the plaza — which became a gathering spot for anarchists and radicals of various stripes, including the Mexican revolutionary Ricardo Flores Magon. Chinese nationalists founded a military academy there in 1903 to train men to fight the Manchu dynasty.”

  • “Having 80.8% of the alphabet available is significantly below the 99.9% full letter uptime reliability we strive for. Since identifying the root case of this issue, we’ve started bringing vowels back to Gmail, so you should see them back in your account within the next few hours if you don’t already. In the meantime, while you may still see this issue in Gmail’s web interface, both IMAP and POP access are functioning normally. We’ll post an update as soon as things are fully resolved and, again, we’re v3ry s0rry”
  • “Minimalism taken to a new level.
    Unfortunately for Eastman, he did not live long enough, and these works have been resurrected with great effort.”
  • “THERE IS NO MAGIC FAIRY DUST WHICH WILL MAKE A BORING, USELESS, REDUNDANT, OR MERELY INFORMATIVE SCENE AFTER IT LEAVES YOUR TYPEWRITER. YOU THE WRITERS, ARE IN CHARGE OF MAKING SURE EVERY SCENE IS DRAMATIC”

Bookmarks for January 5th through January 11th [del.icio.us]

Bookmarks for January 5th through January 11th [del.icio.us]

Bookmarks from January 5th through January 11th:[del.icio.us]

  • Till we meet again, in some screening room in the dark. (15) – By Roger Ebert Slate Magazine -
    “To be fair, James Cameron undoubtedly knows this about genetics. We already know how the female Na’vi evolved breasts. They evolved them on Cameron’s drawing board, because you can’t have a love affair between two Na’vi who are both breastless and therefore apparently male. The bloggers from the tinfoil-hat brigade would really go bonkers then. Roger”
  • L.A. charter schools flex their educational muscles – latimes.com -
    “Bauer, the Granada Hills principal who wanted the district “leveled,” said he actually sees that happening — but from inside, and by the district’s own choice. “I think the current centralized L.A. Unified structure is being leveled by the superintendent and board,” he said. “I think the climate has changed a lot,” said Jennifer Epps, principal of , a high-performing elementary school in Historic South-Central. “I think that just overall, they’ve been realizing that what they’re doing isn’t necessarily right for every school . . . and they’re saying, ‘We don’t have the resources to change these schools fast enough. . . . We need other solutions.’ “
  • Quotes on music -
    “To those composers who use MIDI and drum machines: Keep using them! Realizing your scores via MIDI is not inherently better or worse than hearing them in your head. If you haven’t already, you will eventually figure out how to make your MIDI devices do things no one ever thought they would do! And then you might learn how to hear those kinds of things in your head, something that [the conductor] Dennis Russell Davies will never be able to do.” — Corey Dargel
  • The Founders Of Computer / Electronic Music | soundseller BLOG -
    “Six world-renowned pioneers of computer and electronic music gather at Tulane University to discuss the future of the form – both as they saw it in 1967 and as they see it today…”
  • Dave Winer: “I’m a mystic about What It All Means.” -
    “…Dave Winer’s writings make you “think.” What does this really mean? The best response comes from Winer himself in a remarkable note about Julia Child, whom he views as a “natural-born blogger,” even though she wrote before the blogging era: [snip]. A blogger is someone who takes matters into his or her own hands. Someone who sees a problem that no one is trying to solve, one that desperately needs solving, that begs to be solved, and because the tools are so inexpensive that they no longer present a barrier, they are available to the heroic individual. As far as I can tell, Julia Child was just such a person. Blogging software didn’t exist when she was pioneering, but it seems that if it did she would have used it.” In the same piece, he also mentions that “The story of the nobility of blogging largely remains, imho, untold,”
  • Hello… I Must Be Going-allaboutjazz.com -
    “You are all the victims of Big Lies, conceived by Big Liars and spread by small-time hustlers, self-seeking weasels, Kulchur pimps and self-loathing whores – with a little too much help from some truly dedicated and optimistic individuals who are simply unable to see the forest for the trees. Combine this with those most willing victims – the musicians, who insist upon remaining slaves, shackled by their comfortable ignorance, short-sightedness and willingness to plant their silent lips upon the glutes of anybody who can offer them the luxury of allowing them to work for chump change – and you have got the ideal formula for destruction.”
  • 20 years goes by so quickly – NetNewMusic -
    “As in Dan Stearns recent Trolley video, this video is music from twenty years ago from a group I was in called the Glue Factory Orchestra in one of our first, if not our first show. The auspicious title of “no name” goes with this tune. As you can tell, the video and audio aren’t the best, but the club Beneath Broadway was a great place to play and to see music and theatre and this reminds me of those days. GFO was: Tony Atherton (alto sax), Diane Barkauskas (keyboard, accordion), Dave Black (amplified string bass), Joe Bouchard (Guitar), Jeff Fairbanks (drums, marimba), Martin Tardif (electric bass), and Jerry Wheeler (trombone). Tune by Jeff Fairbanks”

Bookmarks for December 19th to 27th [del.icio.us]

Bookmarks for December 19th to 27th [del.icio.us]

Bookmarks from December 19th to December 27th

  • Los Angeles Eat+Drink – Drowning, Not Eating – page 1 – “Tortas cubanas are almost as common as burritos in Los Angeles. Mexico City–style pambazos rule the world of street food. The muscular cemita Poblano commands a fleet of trucks extending as far as the Westside. But the king of Mexican sandwiches is the mighty torta ahogada — drowned sandwich — a mass of bread and sauce and meat that is less a foodstuff than a way of life. You do not nibble at a torta ahogada; you dive straight into it, trusting that you will come out alive. I had always thought that roasted goat was the emblematic dish of Guadalajara, but tortas ahogadas joints there outnumber birria parlors at least 20:1…”
  • Four New Images by Street Artist Banksy… “Four new images by the elusive street artist Banksy have surfaced over the weekend, with one seemingly attacking global warming sceptics. Banksy graffiti. Photo: Londonist.com The pieces follow the Copenhagen summit. Photo: londonist.com The latest designs were discovered by londonist.com along the banks of Regent’s Canal. It found the first beneath Camden Street Bridge – “almost in the back yard of the British Transport Police building”. The second and third pieces were etched under and next to the Oval Road Bridge in the direction of Primrose Hill. The most provocative simply has the words: “I don’t believe in global warming”, with the writing gradually disappearing into a canal.”
  • “Alt-Classical”: Is This the Future? “Hot on the heels of James MacMillan’s red-hot piece in these pages calling Emperor’s New Clothes on Pierre Boulez, plus Dilettante Music’s digital composer-in-residence contest, and Norman Lebrecht’s poll of the living composers creating the most durable work (John Adams is no.1, then Part, then Reich), here’s more contemporary food for thought. Greg Sandow of Artsjournal’s blog about the future of classical music has run a post about the Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s two new composers-in-residence. They are Mason Bates and Anna Clyne. Not likely to be familiar names if your view of new music is simply what the BBC Symphony Orchestra…”
  • Richard Lainhart: Puremagnetik interview dec 2009“The Ondes Martenot is a very expressive electronic instrument – Maurice Martenot, who invented it, was a cellist, and wanted an electronic instrument that could be played with the same degree of expression as a string instrument. Oraison is a piece I’ve always loved – I first heard it years ago as a student – and when I got the Buchla/Continuum system, I realized that the Continuum would let me play the piece myself, as it’s a superbly expressive controller, with the advantage that it’s polyphonic, unlike the original Ondes. So I spent some time transcribing the piece from the original score, then spent a lot more time practicing it. The Buchla let me program a sound that was similar to the Ondes, but with even more expression in the timbre control, and that’s what I used for my version. So, my own realization is a kind of analog-digital homage to the original – analog in the sound-producing domain, but digital in the control domain.”
  • The Pushbutton Web: Realtime Becomes Real – Anil Dash “Pushbutton is a name for what I believe will be an upgrade for the web, where any site or application can deliver realtime messages to a web-scale audience, using free and open technologies at low cost and without relying on any single company like Twitter or Facebook. The pieces of this platform have just come together to enable a whole set of new features and applications that would have been nearly impossible for an average web developer to build in the past”
  • Orson Welles and His Brief Passionate Betacam Love Affair – Orson Welles – Gizmodo“In January 1985, the phone rang. The caller announced that he was Orson Welles and that he wanted to have lunch with me. Thus began one of the most extraordinary and bittersweet adventures of my life.” Sometimes the journeys we take through this life begin and end in the most unexpected ways. My encounter with Welles in the last days of his life centered on a common interest: Sony’s new one-piece camcorder, the Betacam. It had just come to market and Welles, always the genius filmmaker, had big ideas for what he could do with one. With Welles there were no limits. “You can’t do that” wasn’t in his vocabulary. This was a short, but very passionate story

Bookmarks for November 10th through November 16th [del.icio.us]

Bookmarks for November 10th through November 16th [del.icio.us]

Bookmarks from November 10th through November 16th:[del.icio.us]

  • I dreamed the press would be forgiving – Life’s a Pitch -”Due to the high price point of this box set we will only be able to send out review copies on loan on a case by case basis and will not be able to provide any contest copies. However, we can do contests using single disc bundles from the box set. Please let me know if you would like to run a contest. I have also included a widget below which includes a video describing the box set. … PS. Because there are no review copies we are allowing members of the media to purchase Outside The Box at the wholesale cost $475. Let me know if you are interested. Bold. Call. I understand the loan thing, but the “wholesale” cost? Is that almost insulting, or is it just me? I can’t imagine someone from the classical music press in 2009 paying $475 for a review copy, unless he or she was going to turn around and sell it on eBay for a profit. Which would probably make them more than their paper would pay for the review itself! “
  • Greg Mitchell: The Great Atomic Film Cover-Up -
    “In the weeks following the atomic attacks on Japan 64 years ago, and then for decades afterward, the United States engaged in airtight suppression of all film shot in Hiroshima and Nagasaki after the bombings. This included footage shot by U.S. military crews and Japanese newsreel teams. In addition, for many years, all but a handful of newspaper photographs were seized or prohibited. The public did not see any of the newsreel footage for 25 years, and the U.S. military film remained hidden for nearly four decades. I first probed the coverup back in 1983 in Nuclear Times magazine (where I was editor), and developed it further in later articles and in my 1995 book with Robert Jay Lifton, Hiroshima in America and in a 2005 documentary Original Child Bomb. To see some of the footage, go to my blog. “
  • Michael Kaiser: Does the Symphonic Orchestra Model Work? -
    “One of the Fellows participating in the Kennedy Center Arts Management Institute raised a serious question with me: can the traditional model of a symphony orchestra work in the United States? He observed that salaries are very high for musicians, conductors and guest artists, and ticket demand is not strong enough to cover most of these costs. High ticket prices are stifling that demand and contributions will continue to have to grow very rapidly to cover inflation. I cannot argue with this analysis. Somehow the cost structure for American orchestras has risen to the point that every orchestra is likely to struggle to make ends meet.”
  • The McSweeney’s Effect « Mark Athitakis’ American Fiction Notes -
    “[I]t does this incredible thing for people like me, or people like me five years ago if that makes sense. Because a lot of publishers, for reasons of legitimacy, feel the need to include big writers. Or maybe it’s not even for legitimacy, maybe it’s just to put names on the front cover that will sell. And usually, to be honest, it’s the crummier work from those writers. They rarely, if ever, take risks on folk who they’ve never heard of. You might not have heard of them as the reader, but it’s almost always someone on the magazine who knew someone, someone’s old professor makes a call and gets the story in.”
  • Art review: ‘Collection: MOCA’s First Thirty Years’ | Culture Monster | Los Angeles Times -
    “But this is not just a promotional treasure-house show. Installed chronologically by chief curator Paul Schimmel, it also tells a story — although one that’s rarely heard. The postwar rise of American art is paired with the simultaneous rise of Los Angeles, from shallow backwater to cultural powerhouse. At the Grand Avenue building, which spans 1939 to 1979, the distinctive emergence of a mature L.A. art is embedded within the larger postwar prominence of the United States, artistically dominated by New York. At the Geffen — the story picks up in the year MOCA was born. Two telling works flank the Grand Avenue entry. At the left, a lovely little 1939 abstraction by Piet Mondrian signals Modernism’s shift from Europe to America as war loomed. At the right is Sam Francis’ luminous cloud of gray-white color, painted in postwar Paris in 1951 as an atmospheric evocation of urban light. Francis later moved to Santa Monica and served as a founding MOCA trustee.”
  • The Hundred Greatest Quotes From “The Wire” In Ten Minutes (VIDEO)
    “The Wire” was arguably the best show to ever grace our televisions and now an entrepreneurial fan has strung together all the best lines from its five seasons into one ten-minute video. Omar, Bubbles, Bunk, McNulty, Rawls, Stringer, Avon, Snoop, Marlo, Cheese, Prop Joe, Clay Davis and more are immortalized for their funniest and most poignant lines. “
  • The Source » Twitter users weigh in on the Gold Line Eastside Extension
    “Six years ago when the Gold Line to Pasadena opened there was no Twitter. Today on the first day of revenue service for the new Gold Line Eastside extension, L.A.’s first light rail since then, Twitter is a global phenomenon. Angelenos are taking advantage of the technology to share their feelings about the extension in 140 character blips. I counted over 300 tweets referencing the Gold Line during yesterdays grand opening and the tweets continue today as revenue service gets underway. Early Sunday morning, Twitter users were sharing their anticipation for the day:…”
  • John Cage Visualization on Vimeo -
    “Kinetic typography sketch using an excerpt from Indeterminacy 136 and a section from Tossed as it is Untroubled, both by John Cage. The typefaces are Serifa and Bookman Old Style. The animation is done in AfterEffects.”
  • Disquiet » Keith Fullerton Whitman Live at Root Strata’s On Land Festival (AIFF)

    “Back in September, the first On Land festival brought a wide range of quiet-minded electronicists and other music-makers to San Francisco. I caught the first of the three concerts, which were conceived by the Root Strata record label, but unfortunately for me not the one featuring a solo performance by Boston-based musician Keith Fullerton Whitman. Of course, missed concert opportunities aren’t what they once were. Chances are, someone recorded what you didn’t witness — sometimes even the musicians themselves. And fortunately in this case, Whitman has just uploaded a high-quality recording of the nearly 20-minute set to his soundcloud.com/kfw space:”

Bookmarks for October 24th through October 31st [del.icio.us]

Bookmarks for October 24th through October 31st [del.icio.us]

Bookmarks from October 24th through October 31st:[del.icio.us]

  • Brow Beat : The DORF Matrix: Towards a Theory of NPR’s Taste in Black Music -
    “In the weeks since the publication of the All Songs Considered list, I have been puzzling over NPR’s musical coverage—in particular, its approach to black music. I wondered: Could NPR’s musical taste be as lily-white as the “The Best Music of 2009 (So Far)” list? After scouring NPR’s Web site and studying its broadcasts—All Things Considered profiles, Fresh Air interviews, even the music interludes played between segments on NPR’s marquee programs—I can report that the answer is no. It’s not that NPR doesn’t like black music. It merely maintains a strict preference for black music that few actual living African-Americans listen to.”
  • why i’m not afraid to take your money« by amanda fucking palmer -
    “I know this for myself – it’s something you’ve done since you were six years old, and there’s a sense that if you stop giving 100% you are doomed to failure, and that is unacceptable. No wonder so many players hate their sport – the surprise is that so few admit it.” And despite all the kudos, money and silverware, there’s a reason it’s the top players who suffer most – because they’re the ones playing the most tennis, as they don’t get knocked out in the first or second round. So they have the least free time, the most mental stress and suffer the most physically. Agassi’s avowed hatred for his sport is far from exclusive to tennis. British cyclists Chris Boardman, the former Olympic pursuit champion, and Tour de France star David Millar have both admitted to not really liking cycling. “In Boardman’s case,” says William Fotheringham, the Guardian’s cycling correspondent, “he liked the winning not the cycling itself, and he drove himself to win.”
  • Why did Andre Agassi hate tennis? | Sport | The Guardian -
    “I know this for myself – it’s something you’ve done since you were six years old, and there’s a sense that if you stop giving 100% you are doomed to failure, and that is unacceptable. No wonder so many players hate their sport – the surprise is that so few admit it.” And despite all the kudos, money and silverware, there’s a reason it’s the top players who suffer most – because they’re the ones playing the most tennis, as they don’t get knocked out in the first or second round. So they have the least free time, the most mental stress and suffer the most physically. Agassi’s avowed hatred for his sport is far from exclusive to tennis. British cyclists Chris Boardman, the former Olympic pursuit champion, and Tour de France star David Millar have both admitted to not really liking cycling. “In Boardman’s case,” says William Fotheringham, the Guardian’s cycling correspondent, “he liked the winning not the cycling itself, and he drove himself to win.”
  • don’t care about old composers-rogerbourland.com -
    “I asked Aaron Copland what he was composing in fall 1976: “Nothing, and I am not accepting commissions; if people want to play my music, there’s plenty of it available in my catalog.” Today I went through an old journal, listing old UCLA Music faculty and their appointments and salaries. I looked at all the composers and saw their careers over a span of decades. I sighed and thought about how none of their music is heard these days. And I’m sure that this is true for every music school in America.”
  • Brand (Dis)Loyalty « The Quick and the Ed -
    “A couple of days ago a message popped up on my Tivo informing me of a new service, “Blockbuster on Demand.” Ah, Blockbuster. That takes me back, to that period of about four years when all of the mom and pop video rental stores had been driven out of business but Netflix hadn’t yet arrived, so the only way to rent a movie was to drive to the nearest Blockbuster, spend ten minutes trying to find a place to park, discover that your first eight choices were unavailable, wait in line for fifteen minutes, and be informed by a surly, inattentive clerk that you owed the Blockbuster corporation 27 dollars in late fees and other assorted charges. snip This is what happens when organizations use their monopoly status to mistreat customers. Sooner or later the world changes, your monopoly is gone, and you pay the price… If there’s one thing that’s pretty certain, it’s that people will have more education choices in the future than they’ve had in the pas
  • Music review: ‘Einstein’ at the beach | Culture Monster | Los Angeles Times -
    So “Baby Einstein” won’t make your kids smarter after all. Last week, the Walt Disney Co. confessed that plopping kids in front of its video does not count as instant education and offered to refund gullible parents their money. But the few enlightened parents who tried “Einstein on the Beach” instead may have a wiser tale to tell. Saturday night, Jacaranda, the West Side’s new music series, concluded its first concert of the season at First Presbyterian Church of Santa Monica with excerpts from Philip Glass’ groundbreaking opera he conceived with director Robert Wilson in 1976. Glass offers the option of replacing the women’s voices at the end with a children’s chorus and that is what Jacaranda did. Asking youngsters to show up late at night to sing the last eight minutes of a five-hour avant-garde work is, obviously, unreasonable. Then again, little about putting on “Einstein on the Beach” has ever been practical…”


Bookmarks for October 12th through October 15th [del.icio.us]

Bookmarks for October 12th through October 15th [del.icio.us]

Bookmarks from October 12th through October 15th:[del.icio.us]

  • Views: Professors Should Embrace Wikipedia – Inside Higher Ed -
    “I propose that all academics with research specialties, no matter how arcane (and nothing is too obscure for Wikipedia), enroll as identifiable editors of Wikipedia. We then watch over a few wikipages of our choosing, adding to them when appropriate, stepping in to resolve disputes when we know something useful. We can add new articles on topics which should be covered, and argue that others should be removed or combined. This is not to displace anonymous editors, many of whom possess vast amounts of valuable information and innovative ideas, but to add our authority and hard-won knowledge to this growing universal library”
  • Terminal Degree: Is he kidding? -
    “My previous employer just blogged about the need for a “health care solution that will enable a healthier place for all of God’s children.” Longtime readers of this blog will get the irony: While I was an adjunct there, I couldn’t get health care through my employer. Maybe that sentence should read “all God’s full-time, tenure-track children.”
  • Betty Draper Affair Advice: Not That You Asked | Unsolicited Advice -
    “Betty. Betty, Betty, Betty. I’m not going to recap your various travails here. I’ll leave that to the experts. But I can give you a few concrete pieces of advice (or plot developments, or whatever) that might exponentially increase your happiness. Ready?”
  • The music of Los Angeles on CitySounds.fm -
    “DavidDavid Weekend fun: Citysounds 2.0 “Exactly one month ago, we introduced you to Citysounds.fm, a really cool mashup created by Henrik Berggren and David Kjelkerud during the London Music Hack Day. Citysounds is built on top of the SoundCloud API and makes it easy to browse through SoundCloud tracks from a specific city around the world. Today, Henrik and David inform us about a big update they just launched and let me tell you that it’s pretty exciting. They’ve added a great set of features and we think that the current look & feel is a big improvement. So what’s new? Show more tracks from one city: when selecting a city on the frontpage, you’ll be able to click through to the city overview page where it will show you more tracks from that city:”
  • SoundGrid @ mifki -
    “SoundGrid aims to be the most advanced matrix sequencer for iPhone / iPod Touch to create stunning audio-visual performances in a moment and wherever you are. It was inspired by famous Yamaha Tenori-On and popular ToneMatrix webapp by André Michelle. Even if you never composed music you will find SoundGrid simple and exciting to play with and will start creating brilliant compositions in minutes with just the tips of your fingers. Then easily share them with other users and in turn browse, download and rate their creations. Or you can record composition to audio file, upload it directly to SoundCloud or export via email. You can even create your own unique ringtones!”
  • 10/GUI on Vimeo -
    Here it is: my crazy summer project to reinvent desktop human-computer interaction. This video examines the benefits and limitations inherent in current mouse-based and window-oriented interfaces, the problems facing other potential solutions, and visualizes my proposal for a completely new way of interacting with desktop computers.
  • TuneGlue° | Relationship Explorer -
    very interesting music mapping site based on band in last.fm
  • Essay – The Collider, the Particle and a Theory About Fate – NYTimes.com -
    “Then it will be time to test one of the most bizarre and revolutionary theories in science. I’m not talking about extra dimensions of space-time, dark matter or even black holes that eat the Earth. No, I’m talking about the notion that the troubled collider is being sabotaged by its own future. A pair of otherwise distinguished physicists have suggested that the hypothesized Higgs boson, which physicists hope to produce with the collider, might be so abhorrent to nature that its creation would ripple backward through time and stop the collider before it could make one, like a time traveler who goes back in time to kill his grandfather”
  • Lefsetz Letter » Blog Archive » The Spotify Guys
    “Spotify employs P2P software, that’s why it’s so damn good. It takes 2-5 seconds to ramp up each and every song, which has reduced bit rate during that window, but usually that’s a relatively dead window and the listener isn’t paying close attention anyway. Yes, there are tricks. Only seventy five percent of the song is downloaded, an algorithm provides the remaining twenty five percent. This is how they all do it, it’s de rigueur. And the files don’t only come from Spotify’s servers, bits and pieces come from other users with the software installed on their computers. Net effect? It feels like you own the track. Usability is equal to iTunes. You can fast forward, rewind, there’s no lag time. Well, that’s a bit different. You see then Spotify depends on the network. Which is why they’ve limited sign-ups in the nations they’ve already launched in. They want the streaming experience to be perfect on your mobile device, after all, you’re depending on it…”
  • Acclaimed composer Terry Riley celebrated at Bard — Page 2 — Times Union – Albany NY:3351: -
    “Most composers notate a piece to perfection — hoping for a masterpiece, perhaps — and then move on. But Riley is a dabbler. “I’ll present a piece before it’s finished, then it will be different at the next performance,” he says. “Then after 10 years it will take a new shape that I’m happy with and maybe change again after 20 years. It’s because I improvise so much.” …his roots in jazz and Indian ragas should both come through on Saturday. To him, the term improvisation seldom means starting from nothing and just seeing what happen “They’re improvisations but built on existing structures, maybe not chord progressions (as with jazz), but modes and rhythmic cycles and looplike patterns,” Riley explains. “We’ll have a little rehearsal the day before (at Bard), but also a bit of flying by the seat of the pants. I like that and I think these players do, too.”
  • THE RESULTS ARE IN (Brown List 2009) -
    “Welcome to the official site of the 2009 BROWN LIST, brought to you by the Hollywood Temp Diaries. As you’ve gleaned from my postings and your own experiences, there are a lot of people in Hollywood who are a real pain in the ass. Oddly enough, there are some decent people in this town too (they probably won’t make it too far, but that’s their problem). Anyhoo, I’ve compiled a list of people’s MOST-LIKED and LEAST-LIKED entertainment industry executives in something I’m calling the BROWN LIST. Click on the .pdf below and enjoy the read. Thanks to everyone for participating.”
  • Cloud Eye Control joins the traditional and futuristic — latimes.com -
    “On the fifth floor of the Los Angeles Theater Center in downtown L.A., the members of Cloud Eye Control are trying to create poetry out of collaborative technology. On one end of the large studio, makeshift tables hold laptops and electronic equipment, with a cluster of musical instruments nearby. The middle of the room is dominated by two free-standing screens… It’s only days away from the debut of the full-length version of “Under Polaris” at REDCAT, and there still are snags to work out, transitions to be smoothed. This performance combines live action, recorded animation, multiple projectors, mobile props, and a five-piece live band, so there’s still much to do. And, in the spirit of what Chi-wang Yang, the director of the group, calls do-it-yourself aesthetics, they somehow pull it all together.”

Bookmarks for July 3rd through July 5th [del.icio.us]

Bookmarks for July 3rd through July 5th [del.icio.us]

Bookmarks from July 3rd through July 5th:[del.icio.us]

  • Daily Kos: Scientists Visit the Creation Museum – “Tamaki Sato was confused by the dinosaur exhibit. The placards described the various dinosaurs as originating from different geological periods — the stegosaurus from the Upper Jurassic, the heterodontosaurus from the Lower Jurassic, the velociraptor from the Upper Cretaceous — yet in each case, the date of demise was the same: around 2348 B.C. “I was just curious why,” said Dr. Sato, a professor of geology from Tokyo Gakugei University in Japan” Poor Dr. Sato. Has he never read the Bible? Doesn’t he know that 2348 BC was the year of the Great Flood?
  • Wonkette : Insane Sarah Palin, Late At Night On July 4, Threatens To Sue Entire Internet, Via Twitter – he he she said snowbilly grifter. “Sarah Palin, a snowbilly grifter who spent her entire adult life desperately trying to become a Public Figure, apparently wants her attorneys to stupidly and pointlessly threaten American practitioners of free speech regarding our public figures and elected officials.”
  • musoc.org home: music, society, music society -interesting un-authored site that tries to push an unique “art music” worldview. right now the general consensus is that its a parody (at NNM)
    • 1. define all music in only two categories; pop and art (really no folk music?)
    • 2. has a hall of shame for the “individuals and institutions who debase art music” (why not in good fun?)
    • 3. have a set of criteria for all art music (there definition of art music is ambitious but fatally flawed, they trip themselves up in the complexity argument, also by giving any music/idea a fixed criteria pretty much makes it dead on the spot to be dissected in a vacuum sealed bell jar and not a living breathing ‘art’ form)
    • 4. have a list of ‘approved’ art music (not a bad idea, but looking at their list makes me confident i wouldn’t ever want to be a member of their ‘club’)
    • 5. have a list of neglected classics (see #4)
    • 6. have a mailing list (why not… it would be interesting to see what they think)
  • ‘Freebird’ ultimately unforgettable — chicagotribune.com -Lynyrd Skynyrd released the song 35 years ago. Since then, it has been an anthem, a demand, an ode to personal independence and the lamest heckle in the history of rock.
  • Feed Us A Live Insect: I will always love you Mr. T’s-Bowl – great post (by eli of the monolators) on the ups and downs on my favorite venue to play in Los Angeles.
  • This Is Why You’re Fat and other great single-topic blogs. – By Farhad Manjoo – Slate Magazine -
    The allure of crowd-sourced, single-topic blogs.
  • The BRAD BLOG : EXCLUSIVE: PALIN RESIGNATION ‘DAMAGE CONTROL’ FOR COMING ‘ICEBERG SCANDAL’ … MORE: EMBEZZLEMENT INDICTMENTS COMING? -since i posted this the FBI has come out to say that there is no truth to the online rumors. after seeing the press conference i still think she was out of her mind scared and quit for a pretty good reason. only time will tell.
  • YouTube – Music plays with the listener -interesting youtube video on music cognition (via @laputean)
  • Poisson Rouge’s sense of musical adventure | Culture Monster | Los Angeles Times -Marc Swed checks out the poisson rouge in NYC. “The place isn’t merely cool, as the New York Times has dubbed it, the venue is a downright musical marvel. I wasn’t miserable on Monday, which I might have been with this program. Instead, I found the evening such a pleasure that I hope there is room on the crowded Poisson Rouge bandwagon for yet another critic.”

Requiem for a High Homicide Enclave (05-16-2008)

Requiem for a High Homicide Enclave (05-16-2008)


Requiem for a High Homicide Enclave (Live at REDCAT 05-16-08) from paul bailey on Vimeo.
Requiem for a High Homicide Enclave is a mashup based on excerpts from the from the LA Times Homicide Report which documents every murder that takes place in Los Angeles County using blog posts, comments, and Google Maps combined with a deconstruction

sorry its taken a while to get this one up, that’s what a busy fall will do for you. this performance was based only one the LA county homicide statistics through may 16 2008. right now i’m planning to update the piece and perform it a few times in 2009, but this is complicated with the fact that the LATimes suspended the homicide blog in november. i have a few ideas of how i’m going to update it. we are also planning to get together this spring and make a proper recording.

the audio is from the premier performance of the requiem at the REDCAT spring studio spring studio last may at the roy and edna disney cal arts theater at disney hall) featuring my co-conspirators sylvia desrochers (soprano) paul cummings (bass) bruce gallego (electric guitar) and myself playing the korg kaossillator, and a macbook pro running ableton live triggering a deconstructed looping continuo (henry purcell’s man that is born of a woman) with a fcb1000 midi pedal.

Music: Henry Purcell/Paul Bailey
Video: Paul Bailey
Libretto: LA Times Homicide Blog latimesblogs.latimes.com/homicidereport/2008/11/a-note-to-our-r.html


ars antiqua

“unison, fourth and fifth. all other intervals are shit!” the beginning is a little slow, give it about 90 seconds. thanks to david ocker at mixed meters Be the first to like. Like Unlike


he was mad against this life

REDCAT Spring StudioMay 17 & 18, 2008, 8:30 pmRoy and Edna Disney/CalArts Theater631 W 2nd Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012 The latest edition of REDCAT’s ongoing performance series brings together a dynamic range of six emerging and established Los Angeles artists to launch new projects, investigate new forms and experiment with new ideas. Curated by […]


the sandbox

after another long day of composing and video editing the wife unit looks over and states “its an addiction, right?” i nod silently in her direction and realize its probably a good time to stop for the day. although we have been married 15 years, i don’t think we have had the conversation that followed. […]


requiem for a high homicide enclave

requeim for a homicide crime enclave from paul bailey on Vimeo. (trailer) Requiem for a High Homicide Enclave is a deconstruction of Purcell’s Funeral Music for Queen Mary (1694) based on excerpts from the from the LA Times Homicide Report which documents every murder that takes place in Los Angeles County using blog posts, comments, […]


requiem for a high homicide enclave

here is early view of the trailer for my new piece; requiem for a high homicide enclave based on a deconstruction of purcell’s funeral music for queen mary (its probably viewed best in full screen) Be the first to like. Like Unlike


retrace our steps, act II

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give a man a fish

ok go with bonerama on david letterman “that’s something, everybody all right?” Give a man a fish, and he’ll eat for a day. Give a fish a man, and he’ll eat for weeks! – Takayuki Ikkaku, Arisa Hosaka and Toshihiro Kawabata Be the first to like. Like Unlike


no you can't

“there is a creed stuck into the founding documents that denied the destiny of a nation” “now the hopes of the little girl who goes to private school in newport are the same as the dreams of the boy who parties in the clubs of la“ “we are not as divided as our portfolio’s suggest” […]


but i'm the drummer

for all of you who might ever consider a cruise ship gig, this video pretty much sums up the experience. enjoy, Be the first to like. Like Unlike


the world being nothing other than pseudo-enjoyment

That I can’t say love each other. Or stop and look at things. Or don’t concentrate wealth. Everything I have to say has been said a million times better, plus it’s a cliché. Plus…and here’s the kicker-it doesn’t change anything. The inevitability of history hits me like a mallet over the head. There is no […]


two birds with one stone

one of the great reasons of living in los angeles is sheer amount of interesting things to do. if i had the time (unfortunately i do not) i could have attended two readings of books that have simultaneously found their way to my nightstand. its some pretty great scheduling that both oliver sacks and alex […]


fearless leader

fearless leader

pbe live at csuf 092507
scott mcintosh, clarinet
bruce gallego, electric guitar
matt menaged, electric bass
eric hendrickson, piano
paul bailey, tbone

latest mp3′s from the csuf show and lacc show:

lacc, 100207

cheap admiration

cheap admiration

fearless leader

fearless leader

eye for optical theory

eye for optical theory

principal of sufficient irritation

principal of sufficient irritation

sweater song

sweater song

csuf, 092507

fearless leader

fearless leader

eve for optical theory

eye for optical theory

principle of sufficient irritation

principal of sufficient irritation (with real quiet)

les moutons de panurge

les moutons de panurge(with real quiet)


principal of sufficient irritation

principal of sufficient irritation

pbe with real quiet
meng hall
csuf
september, 25th 2007

download the mp3. (principal of sufficient irritation)


vacation?

i guess this past week i have been adjusting to what many people would call “vacation”. its been a bit disorienting because for the first time in a long while i don’t have anything that i have to do until i go back to work in late august. i still have the retrace cd to […]